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Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German noch, from Old High German noh, from Proto-Germanic *nuh (now and; yet, still). Cognate with German noch.

Adverb[edit]

  1. (Luserna) still, yet (up to and including a given time)
    Balz tondart in aprìle soinda hintar noün tang bintar.
    When it thunders in April, there is still nine more days of winter.

References[edit]

  • “nó” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese noo, from Latin nōdus. Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gnod- (to bind), compare English knot and its Germanic cognates.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (plural nós)

  1. knot (looping of a flexible material)
    Synonyms: lazada, lazo
  2. node (a knot, knob, protuberance or swelling)
    Synonym: broulla
  3. gnarl
  4. knot (whorl left in lumber)
  5. knot (unit of speed)
  6. hub (point where many routes meet)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Hungarian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia hu

Etymology[edit]

From Japanese (, literally ability)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(uncountable)

  1. Noh, a form of classical Japanese musical drama.

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish , , from Proto-Celtic *now- (compare Welsh neu and Old Breton nou).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. or

Particle[edit]

  1. No meaning of its own; only used in nó go (until) and its derivatives.

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *now- (compare Welsh neu and Old Breton nou).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. or

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish:
  • Manx: ny
  • Scottish Gaelic: no, neo

Etymology 2[edit]

Cognate with Latin navis and Ancient Greek ναῦς (naûs) from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us.

Noun[edit]

 f

  1. boat

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization

also nnó after a proclitic

pronounced with /n(ʲ)-/

also nnó after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese noo, from Latin nodus, from Proto-Indo-European *gned-, *gnod- (to bind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

m (plural nós)

  1. knot

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Proto-Katuic *ɗɔɔ (he, she, it) (whence Pacoh do).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

(, )

  1. (informal, disrespectful) he; him; she; her
    Thằng Tèo đi đâu rồi?
    Chắc đi chơi với gái rồi.
    Con Mực đi đâu rồi?
    Chắc cũng đi kiếm gái luôn.
    Thế còn con Tũn?
    thì tao chịu.
    Where's Tèo (a boy)?
    He's probably going out with girls.
    Where's Blacky (a dog)?
    He's probably looking for bitches, too.
    What about Tũn (a girl)?
    Dunno about her.
  2. (literary, fiction, narratology, disrespectful or familiar) he; him; she; her (used by the author when talking about a young person (especially the protagonist) or a non-human animal)
  3. (literary) it
    • 2012, Ruelle, Joe, Ngược chiều vun vút [Whooshing toward the Other Way]‎[1], page 234:
      Ý tôi không phải “phương Đông – phương Tây” là cách phân chia văn hoátác dụng. Bản thân tôi hay nói “người Tây” thích thế nọ, muốn thế kia – đặc biệt khi so sánh với người Việt. Mặc dù không chính xác lắm nhưng cách đó tiết kiệm thời gian cho người viết lẫn người đọc. súc tích, gòn gọn, đẹp mắt, lôgíc.
      Nhưng cũng hơi thiếu.
      I do not mean that the “Eastern – Western” categorization of cultures is invalid. I often find myself saying “Westerners” like this, want that – especially when comparing with Vietnamese people. Albeit not very accurate, that way [of categorization] doesn’t take much of the writers and the readers’ time [to describe and to understand]. It’s concise, succinct, sightly, logical.
      But also a little imperfect.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The term is de facto used to refer to any animal (including the human) in the third person, in a disrespectful manner. The use of the term to translate the English it, or to refer to an inanimate object, is rather artificial, and mostly found in awkward (but common) translation of other languages.

Derived terms[edit]


Yaweyuha[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. water

References[edit]