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Translingual[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a pictograph of a right hand grasping a woman.

Han character[edit]

(radical 38 +2, 5 strokes, cangjie input 女水 (VE), four-corner 47440, composition)

  1. slave, servant

Derived characters[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • KangXi: page 254, character 26
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 6039
  • Dae Jaweon: page 517, character 3
  • Hanyu Da Zidian: volume 2, page 1024, character 7
  • Unihan data for U+5974

Chinese[edit]

-
simp. and trad.

Pronunciation[edit]

Middle Chinese pronunciation (, reconstructed)
Character (奴), Pronunciation 1/1

Initial: 泥 (8)
Final: 模
Division: I

Openness: Open
Tone: Level (Ø)

Fanqie: 乃都切
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
Bernard
Karlgren
Li
Rong
Pan
Wuyun
Edwin
Pulleyblank
Wang
Li
Shao
Rongfen
/nuo/ /nuo/ /no/ /nuo/ /nɔ/ /nu/ /no/
Old Chinese pronunciation (, reconstructed)
Baxter-Sagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character Modern Beijing
(Pinyin)
Middle Chinese Old Chinese English
‹ nu › /*nˤa/ slave

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter-Sagart system:

  • Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
  • Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
  • Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
  • Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;
  • Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character No. Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
Corresponding
MC rime
Old Chinese Notes
9600 0 /*naː/

Definitions[edit]

  1. servant
  2. I
  3. enslave

Japanese[edit]

Kanji[edit]

(common “Jōyō” kanji)

a thing, an object; (derogatory, familiar) a person

Readings[edit]


Korean[edit]

Hanja[edit]

(no) (hangeul , revised no, McCune-Reischauer no)

  1. This entry needs a definition. Please add one, then remove {{defn}}.

Vietnamese[edit]

Han character[edit]

(, no, , nọ)

  1. (colloquial) he, she, it

Usage notes[edit]

  • Chữ Nôm.
  • This is the common form of this character. The regular form is .
  • The term is de facto used to refer to any animal (including the human) in the third person, in a disrespectful manner. The use of the term to translate the English it, or to refer to an inanimate object, is rather artificial, and mostly found in awkward (but common) translation of other languages.

References[edit]