noch

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: nöch

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch noch, from Old Dutch noh (until now, still), from Proto-Germanic *nuh (still, literally now too), from Proto-Indo-European *nu (now) + *-kʷe (and, also).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔx/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: noch
  • Rhymes: -ɔx
  • Homophone: nog

Conjunction[edit]

noch...noch

  1. neither...nor
    Als een ei te gaar gekookt wordt, verschijnt er soms een groenachtige ring rond de eidooier. Dit is het resultaat van ijzer- en zwavelsamenstellingen in het ei. Het kan ook vóórkomen wanneer er veel ijzer in het kokende water zit. De groene ring beïnvloedt noch smaak noch de samenstelling.[1]
    If an egg is cooked too well, there sometimes appears a greenish ring around the egg yolk. This is the result of compositions of iron and sulfur in the egg. It can also occur whenever there is much iron in the cooking water. The green ring influences neither the taste nor the composition.

Conjunction[edit]

noch

  1. nor
    Officieel heeft de Europese Unie echter geen hoofdstad, noch de intentie er een vast te leggen.[2]
    Officially, however, the European Union has no capital, nor the intention to declare one.

Descendants[edit]

  • Negerhollands: noch, nochal

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German noch, nog, from Old High German noh, from Proto-West Germanic *noh, from Proto-Germanic *nuh, from Proto-Indo-European *nū-kʷe-. Cognate to Dutch nog and noch (which are etymologically the same word).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔx/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /nɔ/, /no/ (chiefly southern Germany and Austria; also in the northern half in some positions, e.g. before nicht)
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. still, yet (up to and including a given time)
    Du magst mich noch.
    You still like me.
    Ich bin noch nicht fertig.
    I’m not ready yet.
  2. yet, eventually (at an unknown time in the future)
    Er wird noch kommen.
    He will come eventually.
    Das brauche ich später noch.
    I'll need that sometime.
  3. additionally, in addition, besides, else; more often expressed in English with another, more
    Da ist noch einer.
    There’s another one.
    Da sind noch welche.
    There are some more.
    Ich habe noch Schokolade im Auto.
    I have some more chocolate in the car.
    Weißt du noch was?
    Can you think of anything else?
  4. (only) just; barely (by a small margin)
    Ich habe es gerade noch geschafft.
    I made it just in time.
  5. (with comparative) even
    Deins ist noch schöner!
    Yours is even prettier!

Derived terms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

...noch

  1. (following a negation, especially weder) nor; function word introducing each except the first term or series, indicating none of them is true
    Ich mag weder ihn, noch dich.I like neither him nor you.
    Er versteht es nicht, noch wird er es jemals verstehen.
    He doesn’t understand it, nor will he ever understand it.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. still, yet
  2. else

Further reading[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch noh (until now, still), from Proto-Germanic *nuh (still, literally now too), from Proto-Indo-European *nu (now) + *-kʷe- (and, also).

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. still, as before
  2. later, after all
  3. yet again
  4. additionally
  5. (with a comparative) even, yet

Descendants[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

noch

  1. neither, nor

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *nu-kʷe (and now), from Proto-Indo-European *nu-kʷe, equivalent to no- + -ch-. Cognate with Old High German noh (from Proto-Germanic *nuh).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

noch

  1. but, however, and yet

Derived terms[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin noctem, accusative of nox.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

noch f (oblique plural nochs, nominative singular noch, nominative plural nochs)

  1. night

Descendants[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

noch f (plural noches)

  1. Apocopic form of noche (night)
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 4v.
      veno el angel del cŕador de noch ¬ dixo alabá. Gvardate de aquel oḿe nol fagas mal.
      [But] the angel of the Creator came to Laban at night and said to him, “Beware of that man and do him no harm.”

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare German noch, Dutch nog.

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. yet
  2. still

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German nāh, from Old High German nāh, from Proto-Germanic *nēhw. Compare German nach, Dutch na.

Preposition[edit]

noch

  1. to, towards
  2. after

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian noch, from Proto-West Germanic *noh, from Proto-Germanic *nuh. Cognates include West Frisian noch and German noch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. still, yet
    • 2000, Marron C. Fort, transl., Dät Näie Tästamänt un do Psoolme in ju aasterlauwerfräiske Uurtoal fon dät Seelterlound, Fräislound, Butjoarlound, Aastfräislound un do Groninger Umelounde [The New Testament and the Psalms in the East Frisian language, native to Saterland, Friesland, Butjadingen, East Frisia and the Ommelanden of Groningen], →ISBN, Dät Evangelium ätter Matthäus 1:20:
      Wilst hie noch deeruur ättertoachte, ferskeen him n Ängel fon dän Here in n Droom un kwaad: Josef, Súun fon David, freze die nit, Maria as dien Wieuw bie die aptouníemen;
      While he was still thinking about it, came to him an angel from the Lord in a dream and said: Joseph, son of David, don't be afraid to take Maria as your wife;

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “noch”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian noch, from Proto-West Germanic *noh, from Proto-Germanic *nuh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

noch

  1. still

Further reading[edit]

  • noch (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011