nor

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See also: Nor, NOR, ñor, Nór, noř, nor-, nor', and Nor.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English nauther, from nother. Cognate with neither.

Conjunction[edit]

nor

  1. (literary) And not (introducing a negative statement, without necessarily following one).
    • (Can we date this quote by Boethius and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Out with it, nor hold it fast within your breast.
    • (Can we date this quote by William Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      I love your majesty / According to my bond, nor more nor less.
    • (Can we date this quote by Ben Jonson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Nor you nor your house were so much as spoken of before I disbased myself.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Nor walk by moon, / Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Sir Walter Scott, The Talisman
      And, moreover, I had made my vow to preserve my rank unknown till the crusade should be accomplished; nor did I mention it []
    • (Can we date this quote?) Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
      Water, water, every where, / Nor any drop to drink.
    Nor did I stop to think, but ran.
  2. A function word introducing each except the first term or series, indicating none of them is true.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68:
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them [] is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. [] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate [] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.
    I am neither hungry nor thirsty nor tired.
  3. Used to introduce a further negative statement.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      I was about to say that I had known the Celebrity from the time he wore kilts. But I see I will have to amend that, because he was not a celebrity then, nor, indeed, did he achieve fame until some time after I left New York for the West.
    The struggle didn't end, nor was it any less diminished.
  4. (Britain, dialectal) Than.
    • 1861, George Eliot, Silas Marner, London: Penguin Books, published 1967, page 131:
      'I used to think, when you first come into these parts, as you were no better nor you should be.'
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, →ISBN, page 92:
      I wouldn’t like to live here though, not after dark. Sooner you nor me.
    He's no better nor you.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Etymology 1 (sense 2 above), reinterpreted as not + or or negation + or

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

nor (plural nors)

  1. (logic, electronics) Alternative form of NOR

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

nor

  1. Alternative form of norã

Basque[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

nor

  1. who
    Nor da?Who is she? / Who is he?
    Ez nekien nor zinen.I didn't know who you were.
    Badakizu nor etorri den?Do you know who's comming?

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nor (only as singular, with definite article: de nor)

  1. (informal) Jail, prison; imprisonment
    Synonyms: bajes, bak, gevangenis, lik

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • nord (continental Normandy, Guernsey, Jersey)

Etymology[edit]

From Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ (north), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (north), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel).

Noun[edit]

nor m (uncountable)

  1. (Sark) north

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nor f

  1. genitive plural of nora

Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From older nuar, nuăr, from Latin nūbilum, noun use of the neuter of the adjective nūbilus (cloudy), from Latin nūbēs, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)newdʰ- (to cover). Compare Aromanian nior, Italian nuvola, Friulian nûl, Portuguese nuvem, Catalan núvol.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nor m (plural nori)

  1. cloud

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Narr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nȍr (comparative bȍlj nȍr, superlative nȁjbolj nȍr)

  1. crazy, insane, mad

Inflection[edit]

Hard
masculine feminine neuter
nom. sing. nòr nôra nôro
singular
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nòr ind
nôri def
nôra nôro
accusative nominativeinan or
genitive
anim
nôro nôro
genitive nôrega nôre nôrega
dative nôremu nôri nôremu
locative nôrem nôri nôrem
instrumental nôrim nôro nôrim
dual
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nôra nôri nôri
accusative nôra nôri nôri
genitive nôrih nôrih nôrih
dative nôrima nôrima nôrima
locative nôrih nôrih nôrih
instrumental nôrima nôrima nôrima
plural
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nôri nôre nôra
accusative nôre nôre nôra
genitive nôrih nôrih nôrih
dative nôrim nôrim nôrim
locative nôrih nôrih nôrih
instrumental nôrimi nôrimi nôrimi

Derived terms[edit]


Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Finnish nuora.

Noun[edit]

nor

  1. string