nec

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Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin necō. Compare Daco-Romanian îneca, înec.

Verb[edit]

nec (past participle nicatã)

  1. I kill.
  2. I drown.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nec ‎(and not).

Adverb[edit]

nec

  1. And not.
    Io non sape, nec vole sapere.‎ ― I don't know, and I don't want to know.
  2. Neither, nor.
    Illo nec me place nec displace.‎ ― It neither pleases me nor displeases me.
  3. And, or (following a "with no" or "without").
    Nos debe resister sin aqua nec alimento.‎ ― We must resist with no water or food.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apocopated form of neque.

Adverb[edit]

nec (not comparable)

  1. nor
  2. and not, not
  3. neither
  4. not even

Synonyms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

nec

  1. nor
  2. and not
  3. not either
  4. not even

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Asturian: nin
  • Catalan: ni
  • Dalmatian: ne
  • Fala: nin
  • French: ni
  • Galician: nin
  • Italian:
  • Middle French: ny
  • Old French: ne
  • Old Portuguese: nen
  • Portuguese: nem
  • Spanish: ni

References[edit]

  • nec in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nec in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nec” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a thing has happened contrary to my expectation: aliquid mihi nec opinanti, insperanti accidit
    • no wonder: nec mirum, minime mirum (id quidem), quid mirum?
  • Andrew L. Sihler (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, New York, Oxford, Oxford University Press