neque

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Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *nekʷe (and not, neither, nor), from *ne (not) + *-kʷe (and). Cognate with Proto-Celtic *nekʷe, whence Irish nach; Proto-Germanic *nehw, whence Gothic 𐌽𐌹𐌷 (nih). Equivalent to Old Latin ne (not) + -que (and).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

neque (not comparable)

  1. not

Usage notes[edit]

  • In Old Latin, the nec form often appeared where one might expect nōn. Classical use confined it to certain formulae, as nec opināns, nec procul abesse, nec mancipī and others.

Conjunction[edit]

neque

  1. and not, also not
    neque ... neque (or neque ... et)
    neither ... nor
    • Caesar, de Bello Gallico VII, 30:
      neque se in occultum abdiderat et conspectum multitudinis fugerat
      And neither had concealed himself nor shunned the eyes of the people
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 4.380:
      Neque tē teneō, neque dicta refellō.”
      “I neither detain you, nor refute [what you] have said.”

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Aromanian: nitsi
  • Romanian: nici

References[edit]

  • neque”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • neque”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • neque in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I am losing my eyesight and getting deaf: neque auribus neque oculis satis consto
    • there is nothing strange in that: neque id mirum est or videri debet
    • and rightly too: neque immerito (iniuria)
    • and rightly too: neque id immerito (iniuria)