Narr

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See also: narr

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognate with German Narr, Yiddish נאַר(nar).

Noun[edit]

Narr m

  1. (Uri) fool

References[edit]

  • “Narr” in Abegg, Emil, (1911) Die Mundart von Urseren (Beiträge zur Schweizerdeutschen Grammatik. IV.) [The Dialect of Urseren], Frauenfeld, Switzerland: Huber & co., page 66.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognate with Yiddish נאַר(nar).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (most of Germany, parts of Austria) IPA(key): /nar/, [näɐ̯], [naː]
  • (Austria, parts of southern Germany, Switzerland) IPA(key): /nar/, [när], [nɑr]
  • Homophone: na
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Narr m (genitive Narren, plural Narren, female Närrin)

  1. (poetic for younger speakers) fool (a person being stupid or oblivious to facts)
  2. (historical) jester, fool (a person employed to feign idiocy, often as a satirical cover for valid political arguments)
  3. Used in compounds to indicate an obsession; freak
    Auto (car) + ‎Narr → ‎Autonarr (car freak)
    Pferde (horses) + ‎Narr → ‎Pferdenarr (horse lover)
    Waffen (weapons) + ‎Narr → ‎Waffennarr (gun nut)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Narr in Duden online

German Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German narre. Compare Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro.

Noun[edit]

Narr m (plural Narren)

  1. fool

See also[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognate with German Narr, Yiddish נאַר(nar).

Noun[edit]

Narr m (plural Narre)

  1. fool