roman

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See also: Roman, Rómán, román, român, and róman

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: rōmən, IPA(key): /ˈrəʊmən/
  • Hyphenation: ro‧man

Adjective[edit]

roman (not comparable)

  1. (of type) Upright, as opposed to italic.
  2. (of text, computing) Of or related to the Latin alphabet.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

roman

  1. Third-person singular present indicative form of romandre.
  2. Second-person singular imperative form of romandre.

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

roman

  1. novel, epic
  2. Romanian

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roman m (plural romans, diminutive romannetje n)

  1. novel (work of fiction)

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

In the 19th century, borrowed from Latin romanus.[1] or from the French noun below [2], originally from Old French romanz (common language).

Adjective[edit]

roman m (feminine romane, masculine plural romans, feminine plural romanes)

  1. Romance (in linguistics)
  2. romanesque (in history of art)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French romanz (common language (as opposed to Latin)), from Medieval Latin rōmānicē, Vulgar Latin *romanicē (in the way of the Romans (as opposed to the Franks)) from Latin rōmānicus < rōmānus.[3]. The meaning “common language” changed into “book in common language” and then into “adventure novel”.[1]

Noun[edit]

roman m (plural romans)

  1. novel (work of fiction)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 2009, Jacqueline Picoche; Jean-Claude Rolland, “Annexe IV, roman”, in Dictionnaire étymologique du français (in French), Paris: Dictionnaires Le Robert:
  2. ^ http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/roman
  3. ^ 1964, Albert Dauzat; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand, “roman”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse:

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

roman m

  1. novel (work of fiction)

Inflection[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French roman, "novel, epic", from Old French romanz.

Noun[edit]

roman n (plural romane)

  1. novel, epic (work of fiction)

Etymology 2[edit]

From French roman, "a medieval romance".

Noun[edit]

roman n (plural romane)

  1. Medieval romance
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Latin rōmānus.

Noun[edit]

roman m (plural romani)

  1. Roman
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /rǒmaːn/
  • Hyphenation: ro‧man

Etymology[edit]

From French roman.

Noun[edit]

ròmān m (Cyrillic spelling ро̀ма̄н)

  1. novel (work of fiction)

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Noun[edit]

roman m inan (??? please provide the genitive!, ??? please provide the nominative plural!)

  1. novel (work of prose fiction)


This Slovene entry was created from the translations listed at novel. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see roman in the Slovene Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) May 2008


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roman c

  1. a novel (a work of fiction)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French roman.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roman (definite accusative romanı, plural romanlar)

  1. novel

Declension[edit]