fable

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French fable, from Latin fābula, from fārī (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix). See ban, and compare fabulous, fame. Doublet of fabula.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: fā′bəl, IPA(key): /ˈfeɪbəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ble

Noun[edit]

fable (plural fables)

  1. A fictitious narrative intended to enforce some useful truth or precept, usually with animals, etc. as characters; an apologue. Prototypically, Aesop's Fables.
    Synonym: morality play
  2. Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.
    Synonym: legend
  3. Fiction; untruth; falsehood.
  4. The plot, story, or connected series of events forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.
    • 1695, John Dryden, A Parallel betwixt Painting and Poetry:
      For the moral (as Bossu observes,) is the first business of the poet, as being the groundwork of his instruction. This being formed, he contrives such a design, or fable, as may be most suitable to the moral;

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

fable (third-person singular simple present fables, present participle fabling, simple past and past participle fabled)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction; to write or utter what is not true.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene ii], page 111, column 2:
      He Fables not, I heare the enemie: / Out ſome light Horſemen, and peruſe their Wings.
    • 1709, Mat[thew] Prior, “An Ode, Humbly Inscrib’d to the Queen”, in Poems on Several Occasions, 2nd edition, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], OCLC 1103119849, stanza XVII, page 287:
      Vain now the Tales which fab’ling Poets tell, / That wav’ring Conqueſt ſtill deſires to rove; / In Marlbrô’s Camp the Goddeſs knows to dwell: / Long as the Hero’s Life remains her Love.
    • 1852, Matthew Arnold, Empedocles on Etna, Act II, in Empedocles on Etna and Other Poems, London: B. Fellowes, p. 50,[1]
      He fables, yet speaks truth.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To make up; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely; to recount in the form of a fable.
    Synonyms: make up, invent, feign, devise
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VI”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554, lines 288–292:
      [] erre not that ſo ſhall end / The ſtrife of Glorie: which we mean to win, / Or turn this Heav’n itſelf into the Hell / Thou fableſt []
    • 1691, “Cassandra, or, Divination”, in Arthur Gorges, transl., The Wisdom of the Ancients, London, translation of [De Sapientia Veterum] by Francis Bacon, page 1:
      THE Poets Fable, That Apollo being enamoured of Caſſandra, was by her many ſhifts and cunning ſlights ſtill deluded in his Deſire []
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 2: Nestor]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483, part I [Telemachia], page 24:
      Fabled by the daughters of memory. And yet it was in some way if not as memory fabled it. A phrase, then, of impatience, thud of Blake’s wings of excess.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fable, borrowed from Latin fabula.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fable f (plural fables)

  1. fable, story

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the noun fabel, ultimately from Latin fabula, from fā(rī) (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fable (imperative fabl or fable, present tense fabler, passive fables, simple past and past participle fabla or fablet)

  1. to fantasize, dream
    fable om suksess
    dream about success

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the noun fabel, ultimately from Latin fabula, from fā(rī) (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fable (imperative fabl, present tense fablar, simple past and past participle fabla)

  1. to fantasize, dream
    fable om suksess
    dream about success
  2. to make up (something)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin fabula.

Noun[edit]

fable f (oblique plural fables, nominative singular fable, nominative plural fables)

  1. fable, story

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: fabele
  • Middle English: fable
  • Middle French: fable

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fable

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fablar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fablar.