oom

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See also: Oom and -oom

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Afrikaans oom. Doublet of eam.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oom (plural ooms)

  1. (South Africa) An older man, especially an uncle. (Frequently as a respectful form of address.) [from 19th c.]
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 73:
      He raised his glass. ‘Here's to you, Oom Ben,’ he said. ‘Give them hell.’

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch oom, from Middle Dutch oom, from Old Dutch *ōm, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz (maternal uncle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oom (plural ooms, diminutive oompie)

  1. uncle

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch oom, from Old Dutch *ōm, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz (maternal uncle).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /oːm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: oom
  • Rhymes: -oːm

Noun[edit]

oom m (plural ooms, diminutive oompje n)

  1. uncle
    Synonym: nonkel

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: oom
  • Indonesian: om
  • West Frisian: omme, omke
  • Sranan Tongo: omu

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *ōm, from Proto-Germanic *awahaimaz (maternal uncle).

Noun[edit]

ôom m

  1. uncle, brother of one's parent (originally specifically one's mother)

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • oom”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “oom”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN


Wolof[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oom

  1. knee