eom

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See also: Eom and EOM

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

eom

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of em

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *im, from Proto-Germanic *immi (I am), via the variant *imō by analogy with regular first-person singular ending *-ō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist), a form of the verb *wesaną. The variant eam is apparently after the vocalism of eart.[1]

Akin to Old Norse em (I am), Gothic 𐌹𐌼 (im, I am), Old High German bim (I am), Ancient Greek εἰμί (eimí), Sanskrit अस्मि (ásmi).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

eom

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wesan
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: am, em
    • English: am
    • Scots: am
    • Yola: aam, am

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

eom

  1. Alternative form of him: (to) him/it/them

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ringe, Donald; Taylor, Ann (2014) The Development of Old English (A Linguistic History of English; 2), Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 113

Umbrian[edit]

The spelling of this entry has been normalized per WT:About Umbrian or recent spelling standards of the language.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *eō. Cognate with Latin .

Verb[edit]

eom (intransitive)

  1. to go

References[edit]

  • Ancillotti, Augusto; Cerri, Romolo (2015), “etu”, in Vocabolario dell'umbro delle tavole di Gubbio [Vocabulary of Umbrian and of the Iguvine Tables] (in Italian), page 18
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “eō, īre”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 191