mee

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See also: Mee, meé, me'e, mee-, me'ẽ, and mēē

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mee, variant of me, from Old English (me). More at me.

Pronoun[edit]

mee (personal pronoun)

  1. Obsolete form of me.
  2. obsolete emphatic of me
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book III”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      Behold mee then, mee for him, life for life
      I offer, on mee let thine anger fall;
      Account mee man; []

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing Min Nan ().

Noun[edit]

mee (countable and uncountable, plural mees)

  1. (cooking, Malaysia, Singapore) Noodles, or a dish containing noodles.
    • 1956, Anthony Burgess, Time for a Tiger (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 116:
      He watched with pleasure the food sellers swirling the frying mee round in their kualis over primitive charcoal fires.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Afrikaans[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch mee, from older mede with the frequent loss of intervocalic -d-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mee

  1. (postpositional) adverbial form of met

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From older mede with the frequent loss of intervocalic -d- (cf. kou vs. koude ["cold"]; slee vs. slede ["sleigh"]). The forms mee and mede were subsequently distributed to different senses.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /meː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mee
  • Rhymes: -eː

Adverb[edit]

mee

  1. (postpositional) adverbial form of met
  2. along, together (i.e. with one)

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: mee
  • Jersey Dutch:

Adjective[edit]

mee (used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. able to follow
    Ik ben niet meer mee.
    I cannot follow anymore.

Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mee

  1. genitive singular of mesi

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

mee

  1. (colloquial or dialectal) inflection of mennä:
    1. present active indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular present imperative
    3. second-person singular present active imperative connegative

Alternative forms[edit]

Fula[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mai.

Noun[edit]

mee o

  1. (Pular) May
    Synonym: duujal

References[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mee (first-person possessive meeku, second-person possessive meemu, third-person possessive meenya)

  1. Misspelling of mi.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mee

  1. Alternative form of

Malay[edit]

Noun[edit]

mee

  1. Misspelling of mi.

Manx[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *mī, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

Pronoun[edit]

mee (emphatic mish)

  1. I, me
    Ta mee aynshoh.I am here.
    As ta mee gra riu.And I say unto you.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *mīns, from Proto-Indo-European *mḗh₁n̥s (moon, month).

Noun[edit]

mee f (genitive singular mee, plural meeghyn)

  1. month
    Mee HouneyNovember
    Mee LuanistynAugust
    mee ny heaystlunar month
    mee ny molleyhoneymoon

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mee vee unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *mē, from Proto-Germanic *maiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mêe

  1. more

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mêe

  1. more, to a greater degree
    Antonym: min
  2. more often, more frequently
    Antonym: min
  3. better
  4. rather
  5. later, further on in time
  6. also, furthermore

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mee (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • mee (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Naxi[edit]

"mee" written in Dongba script

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mee

  1. sky
  2. heaven

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mee

  1. mark; print

Classifier[edit]

mee

  1. classifier for a mark or print

Etymology 3[edit]

Naxi numbers (edit)
[a], [b], [c] ←  10  ←  1,000 10,000
    Cardinal: mee

Numeral[edit]

mee

  1. ten thousand

Neapolitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mèe f pl (first person singular possessive)

  1. Alternative form of mèje; feminine plural of mìo

Pronoun[edit]

mèe f pl (first person singular possessive)

  1. Alternative form of mèje; feminine plural of mìo

Sinacantán[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mee

  1. green or blue

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Vocabularios de la lengua xinca de Sinacantan (1868, D. Juan Gavarrete)

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

mee

  1. inflection of mear:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: me‧e
  • IPA(key): /meˈʔeʔ/, [mɛˈʔɛʔ]

Noun[edit]

meê (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜒᜁ)

  1. Alternative form of me: bleat

Yola[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English me, from Old English , from Proto-West Germanic, from Proto-Germanic *miz, dative of *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *me.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mee

  1. oblique of ich: me
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 48:
      Dinna ishe mee a raison.
      Do not ask me the reason.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 71:
      Teach mee.
      Hand to me.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English mi, my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-West Germanic *mīn.

Determiner[edit]

mee

  1. my
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 23:
      Ich at mee dhree meales.
      I ate my three meals.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 41:
      Come adh o' mee gazb.
      Come out of my breath.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 50:
      Mee hoanès is ee-kimmelt.
      My hands are benumbed with cold.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 65:
      Mee coat is ee-runt.
      My coat is torn.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 80:
      How yarthe to-die, mee joee?
      How art thou to-day, my joy?

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith