mear

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See also: méar

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mear (plural mears)

  1. Alternative form of mere ("boundary").

See also[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for mear in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Dutch maar.

Conjunction[edit]

mear

  1. but

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mear (genitive singular masculine mear, genitive singular feminine mire, plural meara, comparative mire)

  1. quick, fast, nimble, lively, spirited
  2. precipitate, hasty, rash; quick-tempered, fiery
  3. (literary)
    1. mad, crazy
    2. furious, raging, mad angry

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

mear (present analytic mearann, future analytic mearfaidh, verbal noun mearadh, past participle meartha)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of mearaigh (derange, distract; bewilder, confuse; excite, infuriate; bother, trouble; become distracted, bewildered; become infuriated)

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mear mhear not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "mear" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “mear” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “mear” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mediāre, present active infinitive of mediō, from Latin medius. Compare mediar (a borrowed doublet).

Verb[edit]

mear (first-person singular present indicative meio, past participle meado)

  1. to halve (divide into two)

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mēiō, mēiere, reinterpreted in Vulgar Latin as a first-conjugation verb (*mēiāre). Compare Portuguese mijar and English micturate.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /meˈaɾ/, [meˈaɾ]

Verb[edit]

mear (first-person singular present meo, first-person singular preterite meé, past participle meado)

  1. to piss, to pee
    Synonyms: orinar, echar una meada
  2. (reflexive) to piss oneself

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate with Dutch meer. (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mear c (plural mearen, diminutive mearke)

  1. lake

Further reading[edit]

mear”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Frisian māra, from Proto-Germanic *maizô.

Determiner[edit]

mear

  1. comparative degree of folle: more

Adverb[edit]

mear

  1. To a greater degree or extent, more
  2. Used to form the comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs where -er cannot be used.
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

mear”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011