ream

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English reme, rem, from Old English rēam ‎(cream), from Proto-Germanic *raumaz ‎(cream), from Proto-Indo-European *rewǝgh- ‎(to sour [milk]). Cognate with Dutch room ‎(cream, sour cream), German Rahm ‎(cream), Norwegian rømme ‎(sour cream), Icelandic rjómi ‎(cream). See also ramekin.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ream ‎(plural reams)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Cream; also, the creamlike froth on ale or other liquor; froth or foam in general.

Verb[edit]

ream ‎(third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To cream; mantle; foam; froth.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      a huge pewter measuring pot which, in the language of the hostess, reamed with excellent claret

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English remen, rimen, rümen ‎(to open up), from Old English rȳman ‎(to make roomy, extend, widen, spread, enlarge, amplify, prolong, clear, open up, make clear by removing obstructions, to clear a way), from Proto-Germanic *rūmijaną ‎(to make roomy, give room, remove), from Proto-Indo-European *rowǝ- ‎(free space). Cognate with Dutch ruimen ‎(to empty, evacuate), German räumen ‎(to make room), Icelandic rýma ‎(to make room, clear). More at room.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ream ‎(third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. To enlarge a hole, especially using a reamer; to bore a hole wider.
  2. To shape or form, especially using a reamer.
  3. To remove (material) by reaming.
  4. To remove burrs and debris from a freshly bored hole.
  5. (slang) To yell at or berate.
  6. (slang, vulgar) To sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way, by analogy with definition 1.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English reeme, from Old French raime, rayme ‎(ream) (French rame), from Arabic رِزْمَة ‎(rizma, bundle).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ream ‎(plural reams)

  1. A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets.
  2. (chiefly in the plural) An abstract large amount of something.
    I can't go – I still have reams of work left.
Translations[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ream f

  1. accusative singular of rea

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *raumaz. Cognate with Middle Low German rōm, Middle Dutch room, Old High German roum (German Rahm), Old Norse rjúmi (Icelandic rjómi, Norwegian rømme).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rēam m

  1. cream

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ream (uncountable)

  1. (food): cream
  2. (ointment): cream