regimen

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin regimen ‎(guidance”, “direction”, “government”, “rule), from regō ‎(I rule”, “I direct); compare regular.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

regimen ‎(plural regimens or regimina)

  1. Orderly government; system of order; administration.
  2. Any regulation or remedy which is intended to produce beneficial effects by gradual operation.
    • 1832, The Edinburgh Review (page 470)
      Seven or eight annual bloodings, and as many purgations — such was the common regimen the theory prescribed to ensure continuance of health []
  3. (grammar) object
    • The Popular Educator. A Complete Encyclopaedia of Elementary, Advanced, and Technical Education. New and Revised Edition. Volume III., page 394 (Lessions in French.---LVIII. § 42.---Of Verbs):
      (3.) Verbs admit two kinds of regimen: the direct regimen and the indirect regimen. (4.) The direct regimen, or immediate object [...] (5.) The indirect regimen, or remote object [....]
    • 1828, J. V. Douville, The Speaking French Grammar, forming a series of sixty explanatory lessons, with colloquial essays, third edition, London, page 84 and 315:
      Active verbs express an action which an agent, called the nominative or subject, performs on an object or regimen, without the help of a preposition: as,--- Pierre aime Sophie, Peter loves Sophia. [...] Of the Object or Regimen of Verbs.
    • 1831 and 1854, A. Bolmar, A Book of the French Verbs, Wherein the Model Verbs, and Several of the Most Difficult Are Conjugated Affirmatively, Negatively, Interrogatively, an Negatively and Interrogatively. and A Book of the French Verbs, Wherein the Model Verbs, and Several of the Most Difficult Are Conjugated Affirmatively, Negatively, Interrogatively, an Negatively and Interrogatively. A New Edition, Philadelphia, page 2:
      15. A verb is active in French when it expresses that an agent called nominative, or subject, performs an action on an object, or regimen, without the help of a preposition---as, Jean frappe Joseph, John strikes Joseph, &c.
    • 1847, M. Josse, A Grammar of the Spanish Language with Practical Exercises. First Part, page 51:
      Pronouns may be nominatives, and of the direct or indirect regimen.
  4. (grammar) A syntactical relation between words, as when one depends on another and is regulated by it in respect to case or mood; government.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From regō ‎(I rule”, “I direct).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

regimen n ‎(genitive regiminis); third declension

  1. control, steering
  2. directing
  3. rule; governance

Declension[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative regimen regimina
genitive regiminis regiminum
dative regiminī regiminibus
accusative regimen regimina
ablative regimine regiminibus
vocative regimen regimina

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

regimen

  1. definite singular of regim