quince

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See also: Quince

English[edit]

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Quince fruit, flower, and seeds of the species Cydonia oblonga.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English quynce, coince, a variant of coins, coin (quince), from Old French cooing (modern coing), from Late Latin cotōneum, from Latin mālum cotōneum, a variant of mālum Cydonium (Cydonian apple), translating Ancient Greek μηλοκυδώνιον (mēlokudṓnion).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kwɪns/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪns

Noun[edit]

quince (countable and uncountable, plural quinces)

  1. (countable) The pear-shaped fruit of a small tree of the rose family, Cydonia oblonga.
  2. (countable) The deciduous tree bearing such fruit, native to Asia.
  3. A soft yellow colour, like that of a quince.
    quince:  
Hypernyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Thai: ควินซ์ (kwíns)
  • Welsh: cwins
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkiːnseɪ/, /ˈkɪnseɪ/

Noun[edit]

quince (plural quinces)

  1. (informal) Clipping of quinceañera.
    quince dress
    • 2018 March 1, David Montgomery, “Why mariachi music matters in the age of Trump”, in The Washington Post[1]:
      She dances with her father. She leans her head on the shoulder of her mother, thanking her for the surprise gift of this mariachi performance, which she had first dreamed of for her quince when she was a little girl.
    • 2019 October 24, Cat Cardenas, “How Teenagers Are Using Their Quinceañeras to Boost the Latinx Vote in Texas”, in Texas Monthly[2]:
      These days many young Latinxs have chosen to sport trendier dresses rather than ball gowns, combine quince traditions with a sweet sixteen party, or even go on a quince cruise.
    • 2019 November 12, Walter Thompson-Hernández, “The Quinceañera, Redefined”, in The New York Times[3]:
      It is now more common to see quinces as celebrations of identity, including for queer and transgender individuals, and quinces that honor more than the transition to adulthood.

Anagrams[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  14 15 16  > 
    Cardinal : quince
    Ordinal : decimoquintu

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quīndecim.

Numeral[edit]

quince (indeclinable)

  1. fifteen

Derived terms[edit]

Galician[edit]

Galician numbers (edit)
[a], [b] ←  14 15 16  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal (standard): quince
    Cardinal (reintegrationist): quinze
    Ordinal: décimo quinto
    Ordinal abbreviation: 15º
    Fractional (standard): quinceavo
    Fractional (reintegrationist): quinze avos

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese quinze, from Latin quīndecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

quince (indeclinable)

  1. fifteen

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

quince

  1. Alternative form of quynce (quince)

Spanish[edit]

Spanish numbers (edit)
 ←  14 15 16  → 
    Cardinal: quince
    Ordinal: decimoquinto, décimo quinto
    Ordinal abbreviation: 15.º
    Fractional: quinceavo

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Spanish quinze, quindze, from Latin quīndecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈkinθe/ [ˈkĩn̟.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈkinse/ [ˈkĩn.se]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • (Spain) Rhymes: -inθe
  • (Latin America) Rhymes: -inse
  • Syllabification: quin‧ce

Numeral[edit]

quince

  1. fifteen

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]