bey

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Turkish bey ‎(gentleman, chief), from Old Turkic بگ ‎(bég, head of a clan, subordinate chief).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bey ‎(plural beys)

  1. A governor of a province or district in the Turkish dominions; also, in some places, a prince or nobleman; a beg.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 512:
      She was chaperoned by the widow of a Bey whose son had been at Oxford with him, and this gave him the excuse to exchange a few words with her, and then to be presented to the Princess.
    • 2005, Jon Courtenay Grimwood, Pashazade, p. 15:
      Whether his position with the Third Circle made the difference or the fact that he ranked as a bey, life in El Iskandryia was proving easier than he'd ever dreamed possible when he stepped off the plane.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]


German[edit]

Preposition[edit]

bey

  1. obsolete spelling of bei

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic bég, from Old Turkic bay ("rich person, noble"), from Proto-Turkic *bāj ‎("rich, noble; many, numerous"), possibly from Proto-Altaic root *bēǯu ("numerous, great", cf. Old Japanese p(j)iida-/pui-).[1] Within Turkic *bāj ("rich") in turn is probably hard to distinguish from *baj (~ -ń) ("holy; god; true, reliable, honest").[2]

There are different theories about the further etymology of the word beg. According to one theory the word may ultimately come from Middle Chinese baak, pak.[3] Another theory states that the word may have its origins in Sogdian baga.[4][5] Nonetheless German Turkologist Gerhard Doerfer assessed the derivation from Iranian as uncertain and pointed out that the word may be genuinely Turkic.[6][7] The root may well be Common Altaic, although interlingual borrowings are possible, too.[8] Related to common Turkic бай and Turkish pay.

Noun[edit]

bey ‎(definite accusative beyi, plural beyler)

  1. lord
  2. master

References[edit]

  1. ^ “*bēǯu” in Sergei Starostin, Vladimir Dybo, Oleg Mudrak (2003), Etymological Dictionary of the Altaic Languages, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
  2. ^ “*baj (~ -ń)” in Sergei Starostin, Vladimir Dybo, Oleg Mudrak (2003), Etymological Dictionary of the Altaic Languages, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers
  3. ^ "bey.", Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc.. URL accessed on 22 March 2008.
  4. ^ Eilers، “Iranisches Lehngut”, persisches Lehngut in europäischen Sprachen Von Jamshid Ibrahim from: Göttingen 1919 Wilhem Eilers, Iranisches Lehngut im Arabischen, p. 58
  5. ^ Carter Vaughn Findley, Turks in World History, Oxford University Press, 2005, p. 45: "... Many elements of Non-Turkic origin also became part of Türk statecraft [...] for example, as in the case of khatun [...] and beg [...] both terms being of Sogdian origin and ever since in common use in Turkish. ..."
  6. ^ "Baga.".Encyclopædia Iranica. Retrieved 22 August 2011.
  7. ^ "beg.", Encyclopædia Iranica. URL accessed on 7 May 2011.
  8. ^ "*bāja." in Sergei Starostin: On vowel length and prodody in Altaic languages