bye

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See also: Bye and 'bye

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Variant form of by, from Old English (being near).

Noun[edit]

bye (plural byes)

  1. The position of a person or team in a tournament or competition who draws no opponent in a particular round so advances to the next round unopposed, or is awarded points for a win in a league table; also the phantom opponent of such a person or team.
    Craig's Crew plays the bye next week.
  2. (cricket) An extra scored when the batsmen take runs after the ball has passed the striker without hitting either the bat or the batsman.
  3. (obsolete) A dwelling.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gibson to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) A thing not directly aimed at; something which is a secondary object of regard; an object by the way, etc.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      The Synod of Dort in some points condemneth, upon the by, even the discipline of the Church of England.
  5. (card games) A pass.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of goodbye.

Interjection[edit]

bye

  1. (colloquial) Goodbye.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Greenlandic: baj
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Alternative forms.

Preposition[edit]

bye

  1. Obsolete spelling of by

Noun[edit]

bye

  1. Obsolete spelling of bee

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

bye

  1. plural of by

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bye

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bye !

  1. bye
    Allez bye ! À la revoyure.

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bye

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

bye

  1. bye, goodbye

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bye

  1. A ring or torque; a bracelet.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VII:
      And Kynge Arthure gaff hir a ryche bye of golde; and so she departed.

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English boye.

Noun[edit]

bye

  1. boy

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN