alma

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See also: Alma and álma

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From colloquial Arabic عَالِمَة(ʿālima, singer), originally a feminine adjective meaning “learned, knowledgeable”, from عَلِمَ(ʿalima, to know).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma ‎(plural almas or alma)

  1. An Egyptian singer or dancing-girl used for entertainment or as a professional mourner.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(plural almes)

  1. soul

Synonyms[edit]


Azeri[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic almıla, from Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic алма
Roman alma
Perso-Arabic آلما

alma ‎(definite accusative almanı, plural almalar)

  1. apple

Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

alma

  1. second-person negative imperative of almaq



Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese, from Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(plural almas)

  1. soul (of a living person)

See also[edit]


Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese alma.

Noun[edit]

alma

  1. soul

Hungarian[edit]

alma

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɒlmɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: al‧ma

Etymology 1[edit]

From a Turkic language, compare Azeri alma, Turkish elma.

Noun[edit]

alma ‎(plural almák)

  1. apple
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative alma almák
accusative almát almákat
dative almának almáknak
instrumental almával almákkal
causal-final almáért almákért
translative almává almákká
terminative almáig almákig
essive-formal almaként almákként
essive-modal
inessive almában almákban
superessive almán almákon
adessive almánál almáknál
illative almába almákba
sublative almára almákra
allative almához almákhoz
elative almából almákból
delative almáról almákról
ablative almától almáktól
Possessive forms of alma
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. almám almáim
2nd person sing. almád almáid
3rd person sing. almája almái
1st person plural almánk almáink
2nd person plural almátok almáitok
3rd person plural almájuk almáik
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

alom +‎ -a

Noun[edit]

alma

  1. third-person singular (single possession) possessive of alom

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Vulgar Latin *alima, dissimilated form of Latin anima[1] (compare Spanish and Portuguese alma); alternatively, a borrowing from Old Provençal[2] (compare Occitan anma, arma). Doublet of anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(plural alme)

  1. (literary) soul

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.sapere.it/enciclopedia/alma.html
  2. ^ http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/alma_%28Enciclopedia-Dantesca%29/?

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima.

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(Latin spelling, plural almas)

  1. soul

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alma f

  1. feminine singular of almus

References[edit]

  • ALMA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • alma in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima(soul, breath), from Proto-Indo-European *ane-(to breathe, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(plural almas)

  1. soul

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese alma, from Latin anima(soul, breath), from Proto-Indo-European *ane-(to breathe, blow). Doublet of anima, borrowed from the same source.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f (plural almas)

  1. soul
    • 1913, Fernando Pessoa, “Ó sino da minha aldeia”:
      Ó sino da minha aldeia, / Dolente na tarde calma, / Cada tua badalada / Soa dentro da minha alma.
      Oh bell of my village, / Lazy in this peaceful afternoon, / Each one of your tollings / Resounds in my soul.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin anima. Doublet of ánima, borrowed from the same source.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma f ‎(plural almas)

  1. soul

Usage notes[edit]

  • The feminine noun alma is like other feminine nouns starting with a stressed a sound in that it takes the definite article el (normally reserved for masculine nouns) in the singular when there is no intervening adjective:
el alma
  • However, if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun, the article reverts to la.

Synonyms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

alma

  1. second-person negative imperative of almak
  2. second-person imperative of almamak

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

alma ‎(definite accusative almayı, plural almalar)

  1. (obsolete) apple (elma is the preferred spelling in modern Turkish)