soul

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See also: Soul, soûl, Söul, and Sŏul

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English soule, sowle, saule, sawle, from Old English sāwol (soul, life, spirit, being), from Proto-Germanic *saiwalō (soul). Cognate with Scots saul, soul (soul), North Frisian siel, sial (soul), Saterland Frisian Seele (soul), West Frisian siel (soul), Dutch ziel (soul), German Seele (soul) Scandinavian homonyms seem to have been borrowed from Old Saxon *siala. Modern Danish sjæl, Swedish själ, Norwegian sjel. Icelandic sál may have come from Old English sāwol.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

soul (countable and uncountable, plural souls)

  1. (religion, folklore) The spirit or essence of a person usually thought to consist of one's thoughts and personality. Often believed to live on after the person's death.
    • 1836, Hans Christian Andersen (translated into English by Mrs. H. B. Paull in 1872), The Little Mermaid
      "Among the daughters of the air," answered one of them. "A mermaid has not an immortal soul, nor can she obtain one unless she wins the love of a human being. On the power of another hangs her eternal destiny. But the daughters of the air, although they do not possess an immortal soul, can, by their good deeds, procure one for themselves.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or [] . And at last I began to realize in my harassed soul that all elusion was futile, and to take such holidays as I could get, when he was off with a girl, in a spirit of thankfulness.
    • 2015 September 15, Toby Fox, Undertale (video game), Linux, Microsoft Windows, OS X:
      Flowey: See that heart? That is your SOUL, the very culmination of your being!
  2. The spirit or essence of anything.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      From another point of view, it was a place without a soul. The well-to-do had hearts of stone; the rich were brutally bumptious; the Press, the Municipality, all the public men, were ridiculously, vaingloriously self-satisfied.
  3. Life, energy, vigor.
    • Young
      That he wants algebra he must confess; / But not a soul to give our arms success.
  4. (music) Soul music.
  5. A person, especially as one among many.
    • D. H. Lawrence
      I want to gather together about twenty souls and sail away from this world of war and squalor and found a little colony where there shall be no money but a sort of communism as far as necessaries of life go, and some real decency.
  6. An individual life.
    Fifty souls were lost when the ship sank.
  7. (mathematics) A kind of submanifold involved in the soul theorem of Riemannian geometry.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Pages starting with "soul".

Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

soul (third-person singular simple present souls, present participle souling, simple past and past participle souled)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To endow with a soul; to furnish with a soul or mind.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  2. To beg on All Soul's Day.
    • 1981, Geoffrey Scard, Squire and tenant: life in rural Cheshire, 1760-1900, page 93:
      All Souls' Day was celebrated by souling, a custom going back to pre-Reformation days: soul cakers and mummers toured the village begging for a soul cake — a plain, round, flat cake seasoned with spices.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French souler (to satiate).

Verb[edit]

soul (third-person singular simple present souls, present participle souling, simple past and past participle souled)

  1. (obsolete) To afford suitable sustenance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Warner to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for soul in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

soul m

  1. soul (music style)

Further reading[edit]

  • soul in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Noun[edit]

soul

  1. soul music

Declension[edit]

Inflection of soul (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominativesoul
genitivesoulin
partitivesoulia
illativesouliin
singularplural
nominativesoul
accusativenom.soul
gen.soulin
genitivesoulin
partitivesoulia
inessivesoulissa
elativesoulista
illativesouliin
adessivesoulilla
ablativesoulilta
allativesoulille
essivesoulina
translativesouliksi
instructive
abessivesoulitta
comitative

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin satullus, diminutive of satur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

soul (feminine singular soule, masculine plural souls, feminine plural soules)

  1. drunk
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

soul f (uncountable)

  1. soul, soul music

Further reading[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsoːl]
  • Hyphenation: soul

Noun[edit]

soul (plural soulok)

  1. (music) soul music

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singularplural
nominativesoulsoulok
accusativesoultsoulokat
dativesoulnaksouloknak
instrumentalsoullalsoulokkal
causal-finalsoulértsoulokért
translativesoullásoulokká
terminativesouligsoulokig
essive-formalsoulkéntsoulokként
essive-modal
inessivesoulbansoulokban
superessivesoulonsoulokon
adessivesoulnálsouloknál
illativesoulbasoulokba
sublativesoulrasoulokra
allativesoulhozsoulokhoz
elativesoulbólsoulokból
delativesoulrólsoulokról
ablativesoultólsouloktól
Possessive forms of soul
possessorsingle possessionmultiple possessions
1st person sing.soulomsouljaim
2nd person sing.soulodsouljaid
3rd person sing.souljasouljai
1st person pluralsoulunksouljaink
2nd person pluralsoulotoksouljaitok
3rd person pluralsouljuksouljaik

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Noun[edit]

soul m, f (invariable)

  1. soul music

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

soul m (oblique and nominative feminine singular soule)

  1. Alternative form of sol

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

soul m inan

  1. soul, soul music.

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Noun[edit]

soul m (uncountable)

  1. soul music (a music genre combining gospel music, rhythm and blues and often jazz)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English soul.

Noun[edit]

soul m (uncountable)

  1. soul, soul music