plaster

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See also: Plaster and plåster

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English plaster, from late Latin plastrum, shortened from Classical Latin emplastrum (a plaster, bandage); later reinforced by Anglo-Norman plastre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

plaster (countable and uncountable, plural plasters)

  1. (uncountable) A paste applied to the skin for healing or cosmetic purposes.
  2. (countable, Britain, New Zealand, Canada) A small adhesive bandage to cover a minor wound; a sticking plaster.
  3. (uncountable) A mixture of lime or gypsum, sand, and water, sometimes with the addition of fibres, that hardens to a smooth solid and is used for coating walls and ceilings; render, stucco.
  4. (countable) A cast made of plaster of Paris and gauze; a plaster cast.
  5. (uncountable) plaster of Paris.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

plaster (third-person singular simple present plasters, present participle plastering, simple past and past participle plastered)

  1. (transitive) To cover or coat something with plaster; to render.
    to plaster a wall
  2. (transitive) To apply a plaster to.
    to plaster a wound
  3. (transitive) To smear with some viscous or liquid substance.
    Her face was plastered with mud.
  4. (transitive) To hide or cover up, as if with plaster; to cover thickly.
    The radio station plastered the buses and trains with its advertisement.
    • 1941 August, C. Hamilton Ellis, “The English Station”, in Railway Magazine, page 358:
      If Euston is not typically English, St. Pancras is. Its façade is a nightmare of improbable Gothic. It is fairly plastered with the aesthetic ideals of 1868, and the only beautiful thing about it is Barlow's roof. It is haunted by the stuffier kind of ghost. Yet there is something about the ordered whole of St. Pancras that would make demolition a terrible pity.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To bombard heavily or overwhelmingly; to overwhelm with (weapons) fire.
    • 2019 March 6, Drachinifel, The Battle of Samar (Alternate History) - Bring on the Battleships![1], archived from the original on 4 July 2022, retrieved 10 July 2022, 30:36 from the start:
      Yeah, if you think that was bad... having, obviously, here, being people in the modern day and knowing something about the historical tactics used at the Battle of Samar, we did have, at one point, the American battleline sailing itself into a rain squall, staying in the rain squall, using large numbers of destroyers (with, obviously, all their smoke generators) to increase the cover in the rain squall and maintain it when the wet squall seemed to start dying off, and, through that, they just went "Right, activate radar, hello everybody, we can see you, you can't see us", and plastered everything in 14-and-16-inch gunfire until everything was broken, burning, and not able to fire back, and then they popped out for the coup de grâce.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To smooth over.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

A small adhesive bandage.

Etymology[edit]

From late Old Norse plástr, from Medieval Latin plastrum, from Latin emplastrum.

Noun[edit]

plaster n (singular definite plastret or plasteret, plural indefinite plastre)

  1. band-aid, plaster or sticking plaster

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Pflaster, from Old High German pflastar, from Latin emplastrum, from Ancient Greek ἔμπλαστρον (émplastron).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

plaster m inan (diminutive plasterek)

  1. plaster, sticking plaster, band-aid
    Synonym: przylepiec
  2. slice (thin, broad piece cut off from a whole)
  3. comb, honeycomb

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • plaster in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • plaster in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

plaster

  1. indefinite plural of plast.

Anagrams[edit]