salve

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See also: Salve and salvé

English[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Salve (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) enPR: sălv, säv, IPA(key): /sælv/, /sɑːv/
  • (US) enPR: sălv, săv, IPA(key): /sælv/, /sæv/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English salve, from Old English sealf, from Proto-Germanic *salbō, from Proto-Indo-European *solp-éh₂, from *selp- (salve, ointment). Cognate with Middle Low German salve (Danish salve, Dutch zalf), Old High German salba (German Salbe), Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌻𐌱𐍉𐌽𐍃 (salbōns), Albanian gjalpë (butter), Sanskrit सर्पिस् (sarpís), Ancient Greek ἔλπος (élpos).

Noun[edit]

salve (countable and uncountable, plural salves)

  1. An ointment, cream, or balm with soothing, healing, or calming effects.
  2. Any remedy or action that soothes or heals.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sealfian, from Proto-Germanic *salbōną, from *salbō (whence salve (noun)).

Verb[edit]

salve (third-person singular simple present salves, present participle salving, simple past and past participle salved)

  1. (transitive) To calm or assuage.
    • 1985, Joan Morrison, Share House Blues, Boolarong Publications, page 26:
      She feels guilty for pampering him, and salves her conscience by bossily ordering him to go and fetch the clothes from the line[.]
  2. To heal by applications or medicaments; to apply salve to; to anoint.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare The First Part of King Henry IV:
      I do beseech your majesty . . . salve the long-grown wounds of my intemperance."
  3. To heal; to remedy; to cure; to make good.
  4. To salvage.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin salvō (to save).

Verb[edit]

salve (third-person singular simple present salves, present participle salving, simple past and past participle salved)

  1. (obsolete, astronomy) To save (the appearances or the phenomena); to explain (a celestial phenomenon); to account for (the apparent motions of the celestial bodies).
  2. (obsolete) To resolve (a difficulty); to refute (an objection); to harmonize (an apparent contradiction).
  3. (obsolete) To explain away; to mitigate; to excuse.

References[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin salvē.

Interjection[edit]

salve

  1. Hail; a greeting.

Etymology 5[edit]

From the interjection salve.

Verb[edit]

salve (third-person singular simple present salves, present participle salving, simple past and past participle salved)

  1. (transitive) To say “salve” to; to greet; to salute.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /salvə/, [ˈsalvə]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German salve, from Old Saxon salva, from Proto-Germanic *salbō (salve, ointment), from Proto-Indo-European *selp- (butter, grease).

Noun[edit]

salve c (singular definite salven, plural indefinite salver)

  1. ointment (a thick viscous preparation for application to the skin, often containing medication)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French salve, from Latin salvē (hail!, welcome!, farewell!).

Noun[edit]

salve c (singular definite salven, plural indefinite salver)

  1. salvo
  2. volley
  3. burst
  4. tirade
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Low German salven, from Old Saxon salbon, from Proto-Germanic *salbōną (to anoint).

Verb[edit]

salve (imperative salv, infinitive at salve, present tense salver, past tense salvede, perfect tense er/har salvet)

  1. anoint

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian salva.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

salve f (plural salves)

  1. salvo, volley of shots.
  2. round
    une salve d'applaudissements
    A round of applause

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin salvē.

Interjection[edit]

salve!

  1. (formal) hello!; hi!; hail!
    Synonym: ciao (colloquial)
  2. greetings
Further reading[edit]
  • salve1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

salve f pl

  1. feminine plural of salvo

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

salve f pl

  1. plural of salva

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Imperative of the verb salveō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

salvē

  1. hail!, hello!, welcome!
  2. farewell!

Usage notes[edit]

  • This is the singular form. When greeting a group, salvēte is used.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: salve
  • Portuguese: salve
  • Romanian: salve
  • Spanish: salve

References[edit]

  • salve in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • salve in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • salve in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • salve in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

salve

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Preposition[edit]

salve

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German salve (sense 1), and Latin salve (sense 2)

Noun[edit]

salve f or m (definite singular salva or salven, indefinite plural salver, definite plural salvene)

  1. ointment, salve
  2. salvo, volley, a number of explosive charges all detonated at once when blasting rock.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German salve.

Noun[edit]

salve m or f (definite singular salven or salva, indefinite plural salvar or salver, definite plural salvane or salvene)

  1. ointment, salve

Verb[edit]

salve (present tense salvar, past tense salva, past participle salva, passive infinitive salvast, present participle salvande, imperative salv)

  1. (transitive) to anoint

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin salve.

Noun[edit]

salve m or f (definite singular salven or salva, indefinite plural salvar or salver, definite plural salvane or salvene)

  1. salvo, volley, a number of explosive charges all detonated at once when blasting rock.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin salvē (hail).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

salve!

  1. (poetic) hail! greetings.
    Synonym: saudações
  2. (chiefly on the Internet) greetings, hi
    Synonyms: saudações, olá, fala aí

Verb[edit]

salve

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of salvar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of salvar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of salvar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of salvar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin salvē.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

salve

  1. welcome!, greetings!, cheerio!
  2. so long!, bye-bye!

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsalbe/, [ˈsalβe]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin salvē (hail, hello).

Interjection[edit]

salve

  1. (archaic) hello
  2. (poetic) hail

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

salve

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of salvar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of salvar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of salvar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of salvar.