tirar

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear away, rip or snatch off, pull violently, tug) (through Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran)), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to tear, tear apart). Alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō. Compare French tirer, Italian tirare.

Verb[edit]

tirar (first-person singular indicative present tiro, past participle tiráu)

  1. to throw (to cause an object to move rapidly through the air)
  2. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Conjugation[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear away, rip or snatch off, pull violently, tug) (through Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran)), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to tear, tear apart). Alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō. Compare French tirer, Italian tirare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tirar (first-person singular present tiro, past participle tirat)

  1. to throw, cast
  2. to shoot, fire

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto tiri, French tirer, Italian tirare, Spanish tirar.

Verb[edit]

tirar (present tense tiras, past tense tiris, future tense tiros, imperative tirez, conditional tirus)

  1. (transitive) to pull, draw, tug
  2. (transitive, of chimneys) to draw

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

tirar

  1. Apocopic form of tirare

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese tirar, from Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, of unknown or uncertain etymology. Possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran), from Proto-Germanic *teraną or alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tirar (first-person singular present indicative tiro, past participle tirado)

  1. to take, take out, take away
  2. to remove, withdraw
  3. (reflexive, São Paulo city, slang) to mock; ridicule

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:tirar.

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, of unknown or uncertain etymology. Possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran), from Proto-Germanic *teraną or alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tiˈɾaɾ/, [t̪iˈɾaɾ]

Verb[edit]

tirar (first-person singular present tiro, first-person singular preterite tiré, past participle tirado)

  1. (transitive) to throw
    Synonyms: lanzar, arrojar, botar
  2. (transitive) to throw out
    Synonyms: echar
  3. (transitive) to shoot; to launch
  4. (transitive) to take (a photograph)
    Synonyms: hacer, tomar
  5. (transitive) to print
    Synonyms: imprimir
  6. (transitive) to knock over; to knock down
  7. (transitive, intransitive) to roll (dice)
  8. (Spain, vulgar, prepositional, takes a reflexive pronoun) to fuck
  9. (intransitive) to pull, to drag
  10. (intransitive) to shoot
    Synonyms: disparar
  11. (intransitive) to manage; to get by
    Tiramos. Es difícil, pero tiramos.We get by. It's hard, but we get by.
  12. (intransitive) to attract, to appeal to
    Synonyms: atraer
  13. (intransitive) to be somewhat
    tira a lastimait is a bit sad
  14. (reflexive) to throw oneself
  15. (reflexive, colloquial) to spend time, hang out

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, possibly of Germanic origin. Compare Italian tirare.

Verb[edit]

tirar

  1. (transitive) to pull
  2. (transitive) to blow (of the wind)

Conjugation[edit]

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.