quitar

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Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin quitāre.

Verb[edit]

quitar ‎(first-person singular present quito, first-person singular preterite quitei, past participle quitado)

  1. to remove
  2. first-person and third-person singular future subjunctive of quitar
  3. first-person and third-person singular personal infinitive of quitar

Conjugation[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

quitar

  1. to quit

Conjugation[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese quitar, from Old French quitter, from Late Latin quietare(acquit, discharge, release), from Latin quiētāre, present active infinitive of quiētō.

Verb[edit]

quitar ‎(first-person singular present indicative quito, past participle quitado)

  1. to pay
  2. to settle, discharge (a debt)
Conjugation[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English kit + -ar.

Verb[edit]

quitar ‎(first-person singular present indicative quito, past participle quitado)

  1. (Portugal, colloquial) to engage in car tuning
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
  • (engage in car tuning): tunar

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Latin cōgitō fits the bill”

Verb[edit]

quitar

  1. (Sursilvan) to think, believe, reckon, have an opinion on

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin quitāre.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): [kiˈtäɾ]

Verb[edit]

quitar ‎(first-person singular present quito, first-person singular preterite quité, past participle quitado)

  1. (transitive) To remove
  2. (transitive) To get rid of
  3. (transitive) To take off (as clothes)
  4. (transitive) To get off
    ¡Quitádmelo!
    Get it off me!
  5. (reflexive) To leave
  6. (reflexive) To disrobe

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]