quitter

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman quiture, quyture et al., specialised use of quiture (burn mark, burning), from the participle stem of cuire (to cook).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

quitter (uncountable)

  1. (now rare, Jamaica) Matter flowing from a wound or sore; pus.
    • 1395, John Wycliffe, Bible, Job II:
      Therfor Sathan [...] smoot Joob with a ful wickid botche fro the sole of the foot til to his top; which Joob schauyde the quytere with a schelle, and sat in the dunghil.
  2. (farriery) A fistulous wound at the top of a horse's foot resulting from bruises, pricks, or neglected corns.
  3. (obsolete) Scoria of tin.

Verb[edit]

quitter (third-person singular simple present quitters, present participle quittering, simple past and past participle quittered)

  1. to suppurate; ooze with pus.

Etymology 2[edit]

From quit +‎ -er.

Noun[edit]

quitter (plural quitters)

  1. One who quits.
    Winners never quit and quitters never win.
  2. (obsolete) A deliverer.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From quitte or Late Latin quietare ("acquit, discharge, release"), from Latin quiētāre, present active infinitive of quiētō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

quitter

  1. to leave, to quit
  2. to part

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quitter

  1. inflected form of quitt

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French quitter.

Verb[edit]

quitter

  1. to release from an obligation; to forgive (a debt)
  2. to liberate; to free
  3. to pardon
  4. to leave

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • quitter on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330-1500) (in French)
  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (quitter, supplement)

Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

quitter

  1. to liberate; to free

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-tt, *-tts, *-ttt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]