quiz

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See also: Quiz and quiz'

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Attested since the 1780s, of unknown origin.

  • The Century Dictionary suggests it was originally applied to a popular toy, from a dialectal variant of whiz.
  • The Random House Dictionary suggests the original sense was "odd person" (circa 1780).
  • Others suggest the meaning "hoax" was original (1796), shifting to the meaning "interrogate" (1847) under the influence of question and inquisitive.
  • Some say without evidence it was invented by a late-18th-century Dublin theatre proprietor who bet he could add a new nonsense word to the English language; he had the word painted on walls all over the city, and the morning after, everyone was talking about it (The Pre-Victorian Drama in Dublin ).
  • Others suggest it was originally quies (1847), Latin qui es? (who are you?), traditionally the first question in oral Latin exams. They suggest that it was first used as a noun from 1867, and the spelling quiz first recorded in 1886, but this is demonstrably incorrect.
  • A further derivation, assuming that the original sense is "good, ingenuous, harmless man, overly conventional, pedantic, rule-bound man, square; nerd; oddball, eccentric",[1] is based on a column from 1785 which claims that the origin is a jocular translation of the Horace quotation vir bonus est quis as "the good man is a quiz" at Cambridge.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kwɪz/, [kʰw̥ɪz]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪz

Noun[edit]

quiz (plural quizzes)

  1. (dated) An odd, puzzling or absurd person or thing.
    • 1796, Fanny Burney, Camilla: or, A picture of youth, by the author of Evelina, page 99:
      I've always heard he was a quiz, says another, or a quoz, or some such word ; but I did not know he was such a book-worm.
    • 1833, Maria Edgeworth, Moral Tales, volume 1, page 204:
      I tell you I am going to the music shop. I trust to your honour. Lord Rawson, I know, will call me a fool for trusting to the honour of a quiz.
    • 1803, Jane Austen, chapter 7, in Northanger Abbey[3], published 1816:
      Where did you get that quiz of a hat? It makes you look like an old witch.
    • 1850, William Makepeace Thackeray, The History of Pendennis[4]:
      “I’m afraid you’re a sad quiz,” said Mrs. Bungay. ¶ “Quiz! never made a joke in my—hullo! who’s here? How d’ye do, Pendennis?
  2. (dated) One who questions or interrogates; a prying person.
  3. A competition in the answering of questions.
    We came second in the pub quiz.
    • 1997, Jennifer Coates, “The construction of a collaborative floor in women’s friendly talk”, in Talmy Givón, editor, Conversation: Cognitive, Communicative and Social Perspectives, page 72:
      Once all six friends are clear that the topic of Janet's story is a pub quiz, we launch into talk around this topic, combining factual information about quizzes we have participated in with fantasies about becoming a team ourselves.
  4. (education) A school examination of less importance, or of greater brevity, than others given in the same course.
    • 2015 May 18, Matt Farrell, Shannon Maheu, “Why open-book tests deserve a place in your courses”, in Faculty Focus[5]:
      For many it is hard to envision a scenario where a student completes an online quiz (or test) without using their smartphone, tablet, or other device to look up the answers, or ‘share’ those answers with other students.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: quiz
  • Dutch: quiz, kwis
  • German: Quiz
  • Indonesian: kuis
  • Japanese: クイズ (kuizu)
  • Korean: 퀴즈 (kwijeu)
  • Norman: quiz
  • Polish: kwiz, quiz
  • Portuguese: quiz
  • Spanish: quiz
  • Welsh: cwis

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

quiz (third-person singular simple present quizzes, present participle quizzing, simple past and past participle quizzed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To hoax; to chaff or mock with pretended seriousness of discourse; to make sport of, as by obscure questions.
    • 1850, William Makepeace Thackeray, The History of Pendennis[6]:
      he quizzed unmercifully all the men in the room—
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
      'Now, Puddock, back him up—encourage your man,' said Devereux, who took a perverse pleasure in joking; 'tell him to flay the lump, splat him, divide him, and cut him in two pieces—'
      It was a custom of the corps to quiz Puddock about his cookery []
  2. (transitive, archaic) To peer at; to eye suspiciously or mockingly.
  3. (transitive) To question (someone) closely, to interrogate.
    • 2023 August 31, “What's on in the Lords 4-7 September”, in UK Parliament[7]:
      This week members return to the chamber to quiz the government on the Zimbabwe election, teacher shortages, backlog of asylum applications and improving the system for dementia diagnosis.
  4. (transitive) To instruct (someone) by means of a quiz.
  5. (transitive, obsolete, rare) To play with a quiz. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Compare “The Origin of the Word Quiz”, in Museum of Hoaxes[1], 2012 July 10, retrieved 27 March 2019
  2. ^ Tréguer, Pascal (2017 May 12) “origin of 'quiz' ("Vir bonus est quis?")?”, in Word Histories – How Words and Phrases Came into Existence[2], retrieved 27 March 2019

Further reading[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz c (singular definite quizzen, plural indefinite quizzer)

  1. quiz (competition in the answering of questions)

Inflection[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quiz

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizzen, diminutive quizje n)

  1. quiz

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (uncountable)

  1. quiz

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwit͡s/*
  • Rhymes: -its
  • Hyphenation: quìz

Noun[edit]

quiz m (invariable)

  1. quiz

Derived terms[edit]

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quiz.

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizs)

  1. (Jersey) quiz

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English quiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m inan

  1. quiz (competition in the answering of questions)
    Synonym: zgaduj-zgadula

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • quiz in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • quiz in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English quiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizzes or quizes)

  1. quiz (question-answering competition)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

quiz

  1. Obsolete spelling of quis

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English quiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈkwiθ/ [ˈkwiθ]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈkwis/ [ˈkwis]
  • (Spain) Rhymes: -iθ
  • (Latin America) Rhymes: -is

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quiz)

  1. (television) quiz show

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.