quiz

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See also: Quiz and quiz'

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested since the 1780s, of unknown origin.

  • The Century Dictionary suggests it was originally applied to a popular toy, from a dialectal variant of whiz.
  • The Random House Dictionary suggests the original sense was "odd person" (circa 1780).
  • Others suggest the meaning "hoax" was original (1796), shifting to the meaning "interrogate" (1847) under the influence of to question and inquisitive.
  • Some say without evidence it was invented by a late-18th-century Dublin theatre proprietor who bet he could add a new nonsense word to the English language; he had the word painted on walls all over the city, and the morning after, everyone was talking about it.
  • Others suggest it was originally quies (1847), Latin qui es? (who are you?), traditionally the first question in oral Latin exams. They suggest that it was first used as a noun from 1867, and the spelling quiz first recorded in 1886, but this is demonstrably incorrect.

Noun[edit]

quiz (plural quizzes)

  1. (dated) An odd, puzzling or absurd person or thing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
    • 1796, Fanny Burney, Camilla: or, A picture of youth, by the author of Evelina, page 99:
      I've always heard he was a quiz, says another, or a quoz, or some such word ; but I did not know he was such a book-worm.
    • 1833, Maria Edgeworth, Moral Tales, volume 1, page 204:
      I tell you I am going to the music shop. I trust to your honour. Lord Rawson, I know, will call me a fool for trusting to the honour of a quiz.
    • 1803, Jane Austen, chapter 7, in Northanger Abbey[1], published 1816:
      Where did you get that quiz of a hat? It makes you look like an old witch.
  2. A competition in the answering of questions.
    We came second in the pub quiz.
  3. A school examination of less importance, or of greater brevity, than others given in the same course.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

quiz (third-person singular simple present quizzes, present participle quizzing, simple past and past participle quizzed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To hoax; to chaff or mock with pretended seriousness of discourse; to make sport of, as by obscure questions.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Thackeray, The History of Pendennis:
      He quizzed unmercifully all the men in the room.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To peer at; to eye suspiciously or mockingly.
  3. (transitive) To question closely, to interrogate.
  4. (transitive) To instruct by means of a quiz.
  5. (transitive) (obsolete, rare) To play with a quiz

Translations[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English quiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz c (singular definite quizzen, plural indefinite quizzer)

  1. quiz (competition in the answering of questions)

Inflection[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizzen, diminutive quizje n)

  1. quiz

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (uncountable)

  1. quiz

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (invariable)

  1. quiz

Derived terms[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English quiz.

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizs)

  1. (Jersey) quiz

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quizes)

  1. quiz (question-answering competition)

Verb[edit]

quiz

  1. Obsolete spelling of quis

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English

Noun[edit]

quiz m (plural quiz)

  1. (television) quiz show