tir

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

tir

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Tigrinya.

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters- (dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tirioù)

  1. land

Inflection[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

Deverbal from tirar (to shoot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tirs)

  1. shot
  2. shooting (sport)

Derived terms[edit]

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters- (dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tiryow)

  1. land, earth

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Deverbal from tirer (to shoot).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tiʁ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tirs)

  1. shot, shooting (of a weapon) [from 1660]
    tir précisprecise shot
    tir au canoncannon firing
    tir à l’arcarchery
  2. shooting (sport)
  3. shooting range [from 1826]
    • 1854, Gérard de Nerval, “Angélique”, in Les Filles du feu [The Daughters of Fire]:
      Un tir a été établi pour les archers dans un des fossés qui se rapprochent de la ville.
      A range was set up for the archers in one of the ditches that approach the city.
  4. blasting (in mines)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Malay tir; ultimately from Tamil தேர் (tēr).

Noun[edit]

tir (plural tir-tir, first-person possessive tirku, second-person possessive tirmu, third-person possessive tirnya)

  1. (chess) rook; castle
    Synonym: benteng
  2. (chess) bishop
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir (plural tir-tir, first-person possessive tirku, second-person possessive tirmu, third-person possessive tirnya)

  1. alternative spelling of tar (tar)

Further reading[edit]

Old Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *tīros.

Noun[edit]

tir

  1. land

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *tīraz, from Proto-Indo-European *dey-.

Cognate with Old Norse tírr (glory, honour) and Old Saxon tīr (glory, renown). Compare Proto-Germanic *tiari- (neat, splendid), whence Old High German ziari (neat, beautiful, splendid), Old High German zierī (German Zier (splendour, beauty)), German zieren (to decorate).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīr m

  1. fame; glory; honour

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: tir

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “tairi-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 506

Old Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters- (dry), i.e. “dry land” as opposed to lake or sea. Cognates include Latin terra, German dürr, English thirst.

Noun[edit]

tir m

  1. land

Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blue-and-white plates with the French initialism TIR (Transports Internationaux Routiers), which are put on vehicles matching the requirements of the TIR Convention.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir m anim

  1. articulated lorry

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tir in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tir in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Rohingya[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali তীর (tir), from Persianتیر(tir).

Noun[edit]

tir (Hanifi spelling𐴃𐴞𐴌⁩)

  1. arrow

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French tir.

Noun[edit]

tir n (uncountable)

  1. shooting (of a weapon)

Declension[edit]

Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

tir

  1. Romanization of 𒌁 (tir)

Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir

  1. sweat

Waigali[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tir

  1. true

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh tir, from Old Welsh tir, from Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters- (dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tiroedd)

  1. land

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tir dir nhir thir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “tir”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies