tir

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Translingual[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

tir

  1. The ISO 639-3 language code for Tigrinya

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Noun[edit]

tir m ‎(plural tirioù)

  1. land

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Noun[edit]

tir m ‎(plural tirs)

  1. shot
  2. shooting (sport)

Derived terms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Noun[edit]

tir m ‎(plural tiryow)

  1. land, earth

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Noun[edit]

tir m ‎(plural tirs)

  1. shot
  2. shooting (sport)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

tir

  1. rafsi of tirse.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *tīra-, from Proto-Indo-European *dei-.

Cognate with Old Norse tírr(glory, renown). A variant of Proto-Germanic *tērīn-, gave Old High German zierī (German Zier(splendour, beauty)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīr m

  1. fame; glory; honour

Old Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *tīros from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea. Cognates include English thirst, Latin terra.

Noun[edit]

tir m

  1. land

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blue-and-white plates with the French initialism TIR(Transports Internationaux Routiers), which are put on vehicles matching the requirements of the TIR Convention.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir m anim

  1. articulated lorry

Declension[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

tir

  1. arrow

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Welsh tir, from Proto-Brythonic *tir, from Proto-Celtic *tīros, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry), i.e. "dry land" as opposed to lake or sea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tir m (plural tiroedd)

  1. land

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tir dir nhir thir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.