guindar

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Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French guinder, from Old Norse vinda, from Proto-Germanic *windaną.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

guindar (first-person singular present guindo, first-person singular preterite guindei, past participle guindado)

  1. (transitive) to throw
    • 1853, Juan Manuel Pintos, A Gaita Gallega:
      Corría por aquel monte tripando toxos, carrascos, e levantaba panascos que lexos guindaba atrás
      He was running around that hill treading gorses, heathers, and drawing turfs that he threw far back
  2. (transitive) to throw down; knock down
    • 1845, Alberto Camino, O desconsolo:
      N’outono ... pois con alegria moita
      nos ibamos áo longo castañar
      e a reboladas eu guindaba froita
      mentras ti regalabasme en cantár.
      In autumn, with so much joy,
      we went to the large orchard
      and at shots I was knocking fruits down
      whilst you was treating me with songs
  3. (transitive) to hang up
  4. (transitive, nautical) to hoist, raise
  5. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to hang up oneself
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to lower oneself

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1983–1991), “guindar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French guinder

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

guindar (first-person singular present indicative guindo, past participle guindado)

  1. to raise, elevate, hang up

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French guinder.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

guindar (first-person singular present guindo, first-person singular preterite guindé, past participle guindado)

  1. to hang up
    Synonym: colgar

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]