hale

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See also: Hale, halé, hâlé, hâle, halë, and halę

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /heɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: hail
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hele, hæle, from Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from Proto-Germanic *hailį̄ (salvation, health), a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, healthy). Cognate with Scots haill, hale (health), German Heil (salvation, well-being).

Noun[edit]

hale (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Health, welfare.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Northern Middle English hal, hale, variants of hole (healthy; safe; whole) (whence whole), from Middle English hāl, from Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole; entire; healthy). See whole for more.

Adjective[edit]

hale (comparative haler, superlative halest)

  1. (dated) Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, On the Death of Dr. Swift
      Last year we thought him strong and hale.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
Usage notes[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English ġeholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to lift) (compare Latin ex-cellō (to surpass), Tocharian B käly- (to stand, stay), Albanian qell (to halt, hold up, carry), Lithuanian kélti (to raise up), Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes, upright beam on a loom)). Doublet of haul.

Verb[edit]

hale (third-person singular simple present hales, present participle haling, simple past and past participle haled)

  1. To drag or pull, especially forcibly.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 6, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      For I had beene vilely hurried and haled by those poore men, which had taken the paines to carry me upon their armes a long and wearysome way, and to say truth, they had all beene wearied twice or thrice over, and were faine to shift severall times.
    • 1636, John Denham, “The Destruction of Troy, an Essay on the Second Book of Virgil’s Æneis. Written in the Year 1636.”, in Poems and Translations; with the Sophy, a Tragedy, 5th edition, London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, [], published 1709, OCLC 968557217, page 38:
      A ſpacious Breach we make, and Troy’s proud Wall / Built by the Gods, by our own hands doth fall; / Thus, all their help to their own Ruin give, / Some draw with Cords, and ſome the Monſter drive / With Rolls and Leavers, thus our Works it climbs, / Big with our Fate, the Youth with Songs and Rhimes, / Some dance, ſome hale the Rope; at laſt let down / It enters with a thund’ring Noiſe the Town.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Prometheus Unbound”, in Prometheus Unbound [], London: C[harles] and J[ames] Ollier [], OCLC 36924440, Act I, page 21:
      The wingless, crawling hours, one among whom / —As some dark Priest hales the reluctant victim— / Shall drag thee, cruel King, to kiss the blood / From these pale feet, which then might trample thee / If they disdained not such a prostrate slave.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, “Walking to the Mail”, in Poems. [], volume II, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1008064829, page 51:
      By night we dragg'd her to the college tower / From her warm bed, and up the corkscrew stair / With hand and rope we haled the groaning sow, / And on the leads we kept her till she pigg'd.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], “A Court Ball”, in The Squire’s Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, OCLC 491297620, page 9:
      He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [...] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again her partner was haled off with a frightened look to the royal circle, [...]
    • 1912, Robert W[illiam] Service, “The Wanderlust”, in Rhymes of a Rolling Stone, Toronto, Ont.: William Briggs, OCLC 17429753, stanza 1, page 123:
      The Wanderlust has lured me to the seven lonely seas, / Has dumped me on the tailing-piles of dearth; / The Wanderlust has haled me from the morris chairs of ease, / Has hurled me to the ends of all the earth.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial, 2007, page 262:
      They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German *halēn. Compare Icelandic hallur (steep), from Old Norse hallr (rock, stone), from Proto-Germanic *halluz (rock, stone; rockface, cliff).

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. (Uri) to be steep

References[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale (third-person singular present hält, past tense heelt or hielt, past participle jehale or gehale or gehal)

  1. Alternative spelling of haale

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hali.

Noun[edit]

hale c (singular definite halen, plural indefinite haler)

  1. tail, brush, scut
  2. bottom, fanny
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

Verb[edit]

hale (imperative hal, infinitive at hale, present tense haler, past tense halede, perfect tense har halet)

  1. haul, heave, pull
  2. drag

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of halen

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of halar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of halar

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *fale, from Proto-Central Pacific *vale, from Proto-Oceanic *pale, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.le/, [ˈhɐle]

Noun[edit]

hale

  1. house, building
  2. institution
  3. lodge
  4. station, hall

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. to have a house

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “hale” in the Hawaiian Dictionary, Revised and Enlarged Edition, University of Hawaii Press, 1986

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a form of Old English halh without the final -h; compare hāle (dative). Doublet of halgh (attested only in placenames), whence English haugh.

Noun[edit]

hale (plural hales)

  1. corner, nook, cranny, hiding place
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: hale

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman hale, halle, from Latin halla (house, dwelling; court; palace; market hall), from Frankish *hallu, from Proto-Germanic *hallō (hall). Doublet of halle (hall).

Noun[edit]

hale (plural hales)

  1. hale (temporary structure for housing, entertaining, eating meals, etc.)
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. Alternative form of haylen (to hail)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

hale (plural hales)

  1. Alternative form of halle (hall)

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

hale (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of hayle (hail)

Etymology 6[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hale

  1. Alternative form of hole (healthy, whole)

Etymology 7[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hale

  1. Alternative form of holy (holy)

Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hali.

Noun[edit]

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural haler, definite plural halene)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

Verb[edit]

hale (present tense haler, past tense halte, past participle halt)

  1. to haul, heave, pull
  2. to drag

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hali.

Noun[edit]

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural halar, definite plural halane)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hale f

  1. nominative plural of hala
  2. accusative plural of hala
  3. vocative plural of hala

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

hale

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of halar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of halar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of halar.