sain

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Sain, saín, säin, and sain-

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sainen, seinen, senen, sinen, signen, from Old English sēnian, seġnian, from Proto-Germanic *segnōną (to mark with a cross, bless), from Latin signō, from signum.[1][2] Cognate with Dutch zegenen (to bless), German segnen (to bless), Irish séan (sign, omen) and Scottish Gaelic seun (a charm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain (third-person singular simple present sains, present participle saining, simple past and past participle sained)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make the sign of the cross on or over something or someone.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete except in Scots) To make the sign of the cross.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To bless, to keep from evil influence.
    Sain usǃ Sain us, oh Godǃ.
    • 1889, Edmund Doidge Anderson Morshead (transl.), Agamemnon, page 57 in The House of Atreus, 2nd edition,
      Far from my speech stands he who sains and saves.
    • 1983, Robert Nye, The Facts of Life:
      The child was sained then. Fir candles were lighted and whirled round the bed in which mother and infant lay.

References[edit]

  1. ^ sain” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ sain”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).

Anagrams[edit]


Bavarian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) to be

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Bikol Central[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

saín

  1. (interrogative) where

Synonyms[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: sa‧in

Adverb[edit]

sain

  1. which

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn (to be). Cognate with German sein.

Verb[edit]

sain (irregular, auxiliary sain)

  1. (Tredici Comuni) to be

References[edit]

  • “sain” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Estonian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. First-person singular past form of saama.

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of saada.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sain, from Latin sānus, from Proto-Indo-European *swā-n- (healthy; whole; active; vigorous).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sain (feminine singular saine, masculine plural sains, feminine plural saines)

  1. healthy; in good health
  2. healthful; beneficial to health of body or mind.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Manchu[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sain

  1. Romanization of ᠰᠠᡳᠨ

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. Alternative form of seien

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sānus.

Adjective[edit]

sain m (oblique and nominative feminine singular saine)

  1. healthy; in good health

Descendants[edit]

  • French: sain

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *sani (different) (whence Welsh hân (separation), from Proto-Indo-European *senH-; cognate with Latin sine, Ancient Greek ἄτερ (áter, without, apart from), Sanskrit सनितुर् (sanitúr, without), Old English sundor (apart, separately)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sain

  1. different
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14c23
      co beid .i. co mbed a ndéde sin im labrad-sa .i. gáu et fír .i. combad sain a n‑as·berin ó bélib et aní imme·rádin ó chridiu
      so that there may be, i.e. so that those two things might be in my speaking, namely false and true, i.e. so that what I might say with [my] lips and what I might think with [my] heart might be different
  2. special
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 73d7
      Ná eiplet húan bás coitchen húa n‑epil cách, acht foircniter húa sain-bás sech cách.
      Let them not die by the common death by which everyone dies, but let them be ended by a special death different from everyone.
    • c. 850, “Pangur Bán”, stanza 1:
      Messe ocus Pangur Bán,   cechtar náthar fria sain-dán
      bíth a menma-sam fri seilgg   mu menma céin im sain-cheirdd.
      I and Pangur Bán, each of us two at his special art:
      his mind is at hunting, my own mind is in my special craft.

Usage notes[edit]

This adjective is uninflected and always precedes the noun it modifies, which (unless it starts with one of d l n s t) undergoes lenition.

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
sain ṡain unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin suīnus.

Noun[edit]

sain n (plural sainuri)

  1. (archaic) pork meat

See also[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) sein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sagn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sinus (compare French sein, Italian seno, Romanian sân, Spanish seno).

Noun[edit]

sain m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, anatomy) breast (of a woman)

Related terms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pèz
  • (Sutsilvan) péz
  • (Puter, Vallader) pet

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English (whence also English sain), from Old English, from Latin. Cognate to Scottish Gaelic seun (a charm).

Verb[edit]

sain

  1. to bless or consecrate
  2. to make the sign of the cross, to genuflect

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sain f (plural seiniau, not mutable)

  1. sound
    Synonym: sŵn

Derived terms[edit]



Westrobothnian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse seinn, from Proto-Germanic *sainaz, *sainijaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sain (comparative sainan, superlative sainest)

  1. well late; arriving late; sluggish, tardy