sinus

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See also: Sinus and sinüs

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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Wikipedia

sinus (plural sinuses)

  1. (anatomy) A pouch or cavity in any organ or tissue, especially the paranasal sinus.
  2. (botany) A notch or depression between two lobes or teeth in the margin of an organ.
  3. (pathology) An abnormal cavity or passage such as a fistula, caused by the destruction of tissue.
  4. A bay of the sea; a recess in the shore.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinus)

  1. sine

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m

  1. (trigonometry) sine

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus c (singular definite sinussen, plural indefinite sinusser)

  1. (geometry) sine

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: si‧nus

Etymology 1[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

From Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinussen, diminutive sinusje n)

  1. (trigonometry) sine

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinussen, diminutive sinusje n)

  1. sinus

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sinus. Compare the inherited doublet sein.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinus)

  1. (anatomy) sinus
  2. (trigonometry) sine

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Of Proto-Indo-European origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (genitive sinūs); fourth declension

  1. a hollow, cavity
  2. curve, fold, winding
  3. gulf, bay
  4. bosom
  5. fold of the toga over the breast, pocket, lap
  6. heart, secret feelings
Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sinus sinūs
genitive sinūs sinuum
dative sinuī sinibus
accusative sinum sinūs
ablative sinū sinibus
vocative sinus sinūs
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Medieval Latin, introduced in the 12th century by Gherardo of Cremona as a translation of Arabic جَيْب (jayb, chord, sine) (ultimately a loan from Sanskrit ज्या (jyā, bowstring)) by confusion with جَيْب (jayb, bosom, fold in a garment).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (genitive sinūs); fourth declension

  1. (mathematics) chord of an arc, sine
Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sinus sinūs
genitive sinūs sinuum
dative sinuī sinibus
accusative sinum sinūs
ablative sinū sinibus
vocative sinus sinūs
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From sinus (a hollow, cavity).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sīnus m (genitive sīnī); second declension

  1. a large bowl
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sīnus sīnī
genitive sīnī sīnōrum
dative sīnō sīnīs
accusative sīnum sīnōs
ablative sīnō sīnīs
vocative sīne sīnī
Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  • sinus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sinus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “sinus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • sinus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the heart of the city: sinus urbis (Sall. Cat. 52. 35)
    • the city is situate on a bay: urbs in sinu sita est
    • to rejoice in secret: in sinu gaudere (Tusc. 3. 21. 51)
    • to love and make a bosom friend of a person: aliquem in sinu gestare (aliquis est in sinu alicuius) (Ter. Ad. 4. 5. 75)
    • (ambiguous) to be driven into the arms of philosophy: in sinum philosophiae compelli
  • sinus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sinus in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Northern Sami[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus

  1. locative singular of sitnu

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin.

Noun[edit]

sinus m

  1. (trigonometry) sine
  2. (anatomy) sinus

Inflection[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m inan

  1. sine

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French sinus

Noun[edit]

sinus n (plural sinusuri)

  1. sine (trigonometric function)

Veps[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sinus

  1. inessive of sinä