sinus

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See also: Sinus, sínus, and sinüs

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus (a bent surface, curve, hollow). Doublet of sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus (plural sinuses)

  1. (anatomy, zootomy) A pouch or cavity in a bone or other tissue, especially one in the bones of the face or skull connecting with the nasal cavities (the paranasal sinus).
    Hyponyms: ethmoid sinus, frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, paranasal sinus, piriform sinus, Rokitansky-Aschoff sinus, sphenoid sinus
  2. (anatomy) An irregular venous or lymphatic cavity, reservoir, or dilated vessel.
    Hyponyms: carotid sinus, cavernous sinus, coronary sinus, lateral sinus, petrosal sinus, sagittal sinus, sigmoid sinus, straight sinus, transverse sinus, venous sinus
    1. (physiology, attributive) Relating to or denoting the sinoatrial node of the heart or its function of regulating the heartbeat.
  3. (pathology) An abnormal cavity or passage such as a fistula, leading from a deep-seated infection and discharging pus to the surface.
  4. (botany) A rounded notch or depression between two lobes or teeth in the margin of a leaf or petal.
  5. (geography) A bay of the sea; a recess in the shore.
  6. (trigonometry) Synonym of sine.
    • 1884 November 29, “Aerial Navigation”, in Scientific American: A Weekly Journal of Practical Information, Art, Science, Mechanics, Chemistry, and Manufactures, volume LI, number 22, New York, N.Y.: Munn & Co., translation of original by Victor Tatin in La Nature, page 342, column 1:
      So, in the helicopteron, as the helix is at the same time a sustaining plane, it should be likened to a surface moving horizontally, and in which, consequenty, the resistance to motion will be to the lifting power as the sinus is to the cosinus of the angle formed by such plane with the horizon.
    • 1996, Pentti Zetterberg; Matti Eronen; Markus Lindholm, Heinrich Spiecker, Kari Mielikäinen, Michael Köhl, and Jens Peter Skovsgaard, editors, Growth Trends in European Forests (European Forest Institute Research Report; No. 5), Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, →ISBN, page 15:
      The variations are described in terms of cycles of sinuses and cosinuses.
    • 2007, Vladimir G. Ivancevic; Tijana T. Ivancevic, “Introduction: Human and Computational Mind”, in Computational Mind: A Complex Dynamics Perspective (Studies in Computational Intelligence; 60), Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, →ISBN, LCCN 2007925682, section 1 (Natural Intelligence and Human Mind), pages 60–61:
      Basically, the rotation of the matrix of the factor loadings L represents its post-multiplication, i.e. L* = LO by the rotation matrix O, which itself resembles one of the matrices included in the classical rotational Lie groups SO(m) (containing the specific m–fold combination of sinuses and cosinuses.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinus)

  1. sine

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɪnus]
  • Hyphenation: si‧nus

Noun[edit]

sinus m inan

  1. (trigonometry) sine
  2. (anatomy) sinus

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sinus in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sinus in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • sinus in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus c (singular definite sinussen, plural indefinite sinusser)

  1. (geometry) sine

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: si‧nus

Etymology 1[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinussen, diminutive sinusje n)

  1. (trigonometry) sine
Descendants[edit]
  • Indonesian: sinus
  • Papiamentu: sinùs

Etymology 2[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinussen, diminutive sinusje n)

  1. sinus
Descendants[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus. Doublet of sein.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (plural sinus)

  1. (anatomy) sinus
  2. (trigonometry) sine

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch sinus, from Latin sinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus (first-person possessive sinusku, second-person possessive sinusmu, third-person possessive sinusnya)

  1. sinus:
    1. (anatomy) a pouch or cavity in a bone or other tissue, especially one in the bones of the face or skull connecting with the nasal cavities (the paranasal sinus).
    2. (pathology) an abnormal cavity or passage such as a fistula, leading from a deep-seated infection and discharging pus to the surface.
  2. (trigonometry) sine: in a right triangle, the ratio of the length of the side opposite an angle to the length of the hypotenuse.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sinos; akin to Albanian gji (breast, bosom).[1]

The mathematical sense ‘chord of an arc, sine’ was introduced in the 12th century by Gherardo of Cremona as a semantic loan from Arabic جَيْب(jayb, chord, sine) (ultimately a loan from Sanskrit ज्या (jyā, bowstring)) by confusion with جَيْب(jayb, bosom, fold in a garment).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m (genitive sinūs); fourth declension

  1. (chiefly poetic) a bent surface; a curve, fold, hollow
  2. (literally) the hanging fold of a toga over the breast; a pocket, lap
    Synonym: gremium
    1. (transferred sense)
      1. a purse, money, which was carried in the bosom of the toga
      2. (poetic) a garment
        • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.431-432:
          ‘comitēs, accēdite’ dīxit
          ‘et mēcum plēnōs flōrē refertē sinūs.’
          ‘‘Come, my companions,’’ she said,
          ‘‘and with me you all [can] carry back flowers, filling the folds of your garments.’’

          (Persephone and her attendants wander away from the protection of her mother Ceres and the other matrons prior to Persephone’s abduction.)
      3. the bosom, breast
        Synonym: pectus
    2. (figuratively)
      1. the bosom for love, protection, asylum
      2. the interior, inmost part of a thing
      3. a power, possession of someone
      4. a hiding place, place of concealment; a secret feeling
  3. a gulf, bay, bight
    1. the land lying on or a point of land that helps to form a gulf
    2. a basin, hollow, valley
    3. (Medieval Latin) a fjord
  4. (Medieval Latin, mathematics) the chord of an arc; a sine
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!
Inflection[edit]

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sinus sinūs
Genitive sinūs sinuum
Dative sinuī sinibus
Accusative sinum sinūs
Ablative sinū sinibus
Vocative sinus sinūs
Quotations[edit]

Aeneid (Pūblius Vergilius Marō) lines 1.160–161: Latin: quibus omnis ab altō // frangitus inque sinūs scindit sēsē͡ unda reductōs. English: on which all the waves from the deep are broken and it splits itself into receeding ripples.

Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sh₁ih₂sno-, deverbative of *seh₁y- ‘to sift, strain’ (compare Ancient Greek ἠθέω (ēthéō), Lithuanian sijóti, Serbo-Croatian sȉjati).[2]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sīnus m (genitive sīnī); second declension

  1. a large round drinking vessel with swelling sides, shaped like a bowl
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!
Inflection[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sīnus sīnī
Genitive sīnī sīnōrum
Dative sīnō sīnīs
Accusative sīnum sīnōs
Ablative sīnō sīnīs
Vocative sīne sīnī

References[edit]

  • sinus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sinum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sinus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sinus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • sinus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the heart of the city: sinus urbis (Sall. Cat. 52. 35)
    • the city is situate on a bay: urbs in sinu sita est
    • to rejoice in secret: in sinu gaudere (Tusc. 3. 21. 51)
    • to love and make a bosom friend of a person: aliquem in sinu gestare (aliquis est in sinu alicuius) (Ter. Ad. 4. 5. 75)
    • (ambiguous) to be driven into the arms of philosophy: in sinum philosophiae compelli
  • sinus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sinus”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the Other Italic Languages, Leiden: Brill, page 567
  2. ^ Douglas Q. Adams (1997), “Sieve”, in J. P. Mallory; Douglas Q. Adams, editors, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, London: Fitzroy Dearborn, page 518

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

sinus

  1. locative singular of sitnu

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (definite singular sinusen, indefinite plural sinuser, definite plural sinusene)

  1. (trigonometry) sine
  2. (anatomy) sinus

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus m (definite singular sinusen, indefinite plural sinusar, definite plural sinusane)

  1. (trigonometry) sine
  2. (anatomy) sinus

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sinus m inan

  1. (trigonometry) sine

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective
noun

Further reading[edit]

  • sinus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sinus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French sinus, from Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sinus n (plural sinusuri)

  1. sine (trigonometric function)

Veps[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sinus

  1. inessive of sinä