reservoir

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See also: Reservoir and réservoir

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From French réservoir (collection place) (fig.), réservoir (storehouse) (lit.). in turn from French réserver (to reserve, keep).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛz.ə.vwɑː(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vwɑɹ/, /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vwɔɹ/, /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vɔɹ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

reservoir (plural reservoirs)

  1. A place where anything is kept in store.
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 2, page 226:
      Notwithstanding the way in which she had, in what she termed "the delicacy of her feelings," contrived to pour the receipts of the fancy fair into one reservoir, the duke and several other persons complimented Lady Anne very much on the superior beauty and value of her articles,...
    • 2013, Siloxanes—Advances in Research and Application (page 42)
      Within a printer cartridge, ink is typically stored in an ink reservoir and is deposited onto media through a print head.
  2. A large natural or artificial lake used as a source of water supply.
  3. A small intercellular space, often containing resin, essential oil, or some other secreted matter.
  4. A supply or source of something.
    • 1962 September, Warren Smith, “The problems of coaching stock rostering and operation”, in Modern Railways, page 200:
      To replace them and also to provide a reservoir for relief trains, a certain amount of spare stock must be kept on hand.
    • 2007 November, Gil Schwartz, “Escape from the job monster”, in Men's Health, volume 22, number 9, ISSN 1054-4836, page 122:
      The goal is to draw on reservoirs of strength that defy rational thought, so you can wrench your poor, obsessed spirit away from work and orient it toward stuff that matters.
  5. A species that acts as host to a zoonosis when it is not causing acute illness in other susceptible species.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
  6. (computing) A "black box" component that receives an input signal to be read out and mapped by another process, as part of reservoir computing.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “reservoir”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French réservoir.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /reː.zərˈvʋaːr/, /reː.zɛrˈvʋaːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: re‧ser‧voir

Noun[edit]

reservoir n (plural reservoirs, diminutive reservoirtje n)

  1. reservoir

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: rêsérvoir

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch reservoir, from French réservoir.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (standard) /rəsɛrˈvoɪr/, (Dutch-influenced) /resərˈvoar/
  • Hyphenation: rê‧sér‧vo‧ir
  • Rhymes: -ɪr, -ar, -r

Noun[edit]

rêsérvoir (plural reservoir-reservoir, first-person possessive reservoirku, second-person possessive reservoirmu, third-person possessive reservoirnya)

  1. reservoir

Further reading[edit]