nasi

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Malay nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi (uncountable)

  1. (cooking) Cooked rice.
Hyponyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowed from Arabicنَسِيء(nasīʔ, literally postponement).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi (uncountable)

  1. (Islam) The intercalation of a month in the calendar of pre-Islamic Arabia, often considered heretical.

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi

  1. plural of nasus
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Brunei Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Cognate of Old Malay nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun[edit]

nasi

  1. cooked rice

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • baras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Indonesian nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi m (uncountable)

  1. Indonesian-style processed rice (mainly about fried rice in general)
    1. nasi goreng: Indonesian fried rice (originally from Javanese cuisine)

Derived terms[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay nasi, from Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈnasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun[edit]

nasi (first-person possessive nasiku, second-person possessive nasimu, third-person possessive nasinya)

  1. nasi, cooked rice
  2. (figuratively) livelihood, luck, fortune

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: nasi

See also[edit]

  • beras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)
  • sawah (paddy field)

Further reading[edit]

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi m

  1. plural of naso

Anagrams[edit]

Kapampangan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Compare Malay nasi, and Old Javanese nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: na‧si
  • IPA(key): /ˈnasiʔ/, [ˈnäː.siʔ]

Noun[edit]

násî

  1. cooked rice

See also[edit]

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nāsī

  1. inflection of nāsus:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/vocative plural

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Cognate of Javanese ꦤꦱꦶ (nasi), Old Javanese nasi (cooked rice).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi (Jawi spellingناسي⁩, informal 1st possessive nasiku, 2nd possessive nasimu, 3rd possessive nasinya)

  1. cooked rice

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

  • sawah (paddy field)
  • beras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)

References[edit]

  • Pijnappel, Jan (1875), “ناسي nasi”, in Maleisch-Hollandsch woordenboek, John Enschede en Zonen, Frederik Muller, pages 138
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1901), “ناسي nasi”, in A Malay-English dictionary, Hong Kong: Kelly & Walsh limited, page 669
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1932), “nasi”, in A Malay-English dictionary (romanised), volume II, Mytilene, Greece: Salavopoulos & Kinderlis, page 165

Further reading[edit]

Old Javanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun[edit]

nasi

  1. cooked rice[1]

See also[edit]

  • bras (husked rice (unboiled))
  • pari (unmilled rice)
  • sawah (irrigated rice field)

References[edit]

  1. ^ cf. "nasi" in Zoetmulder, P.J. (1982). Old Javanese-English Dictionary

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

nasi

  1. virile nominative/vocative plural of nasz

Sakizaya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese (なし) (nashi, pear).

Noun[edit]

nasi

  1. pear (fruit)

Swahili[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prepositional phrase[edit]

nasi

  1. Contraction of na sisi: and us, or with us

See also[edit]

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nasi

  1. Alternative form of nanasi (pineapple)

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh