gallus

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See also: Gallus

Latin[edit]

gallus (rooster)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From *galso-, enlargement of *gl̥s-o-, zero-grade of Proto-Indo-European *gols-o- (compare Proto-Balto-Slavic *galsas (voice), Proto-Germanic *kalzōną (to call), Albanian gjuhë (tongue; language), and perhaps Welsh galw (call)).

Noun[edit]

gallus m (genitive gallī); second declension

  1. a cock, rooster
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gallus gallī
Genitive gallī gallōrum
Dative gallō gallīs
Accusative gallum gallōs
Ablative gallō gallīs
Vocative galle gallī
Usage notes[edit]

The term gallus is inherently masculine and refers to a "rooster" (male chicken). The term gallīna is used for a "hen" (female chicken). The term pullus refers to a "chicken" without specifying the sex of the animal, although it often refers to a "chick".

Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Corsican: ghjaddu, ghjallu
  • Franco-Provençal: jal
  • Italian: gallo
  • Old French: jal
    • Tourangeau: jau
  • Old Leonese:
  • Old Occitan:
  • Old Portuguese: galo
  • Old Spanish:
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
  • Sicilian: jaddu, gaddu
  • Translingual: Gallus
  • Venetian: gało
  • Albanian: gjel
  • Old Irish: Gall (personal name)
    • Czech: Havel (personal name)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Likely derived from Proto-Celtic *galnati (to be able).[1] See also Ancient Greek Γαλάτης (Galátēs) and Κελτός (Keltós), which might be from the same source.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gallus m (genitive gallī, feminine galla); second declension

  1. a Gaul, an inhabitant of Gaul
  2. a Galatian
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gallus gallī
Genitive gallī gallōrum
Dative gallō gallīs
Accusative gallum gallōs
Ablative gallō gallīs
Vocative galle gallī

Adjective[edit]

gallus (feminine galla, neuter gallum); first/second-declension adjective

  1. Gallic
  2. Galatian
Declension[edit]

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative gallus galla gallum gallī gallae galla
Genitive gallī gallae gallī gallōrum gallārum gallōrum
Dative gallō gallō gallīs
Accusative gallum gallam gallum gallōs gallās galla
Ablative gallō gallā gallō gallīs
Vocative galle galla gallum gallī gallae galla

Etymology 3[edit]

Considered by some ancient and modern authorities to derive from the river Gallus, due to the notion that "its water made those who drank of it mad".[2][3] A connection to the similar Sumerian priests of Inanna called gala has been suggested, but evidence is lacking.[4]

Noun[edit]

gallus m (genitive gallī); second declension

  1. one of the priests of Cybele in Phrygia and Rome who wore feminine clothes and typically castrated themselves
Usage notes[edit]
  • Some writers, such as Catallus, use the feminine singular galla (and/or feminine plural gallae) instead.
Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gallus gallī
Genitive gallī gallōrum
Dative gallō gallīs
Accusative gallum gallōs
Ablative gallō gallīs
Vocative galle gallī

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 149
  2. ^ http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0064:entry=gallus-geo
  3. ^ Maarten Jozef Vermaseren, Eugene N. Lane, Cybelle, Attis and related cults: essays in memory of M. J. Vermaseren (1996, BRILL, →ISBN), page 123-130
  4. ^ Philippe Borgeaud, Mother of the Gods: From Cybele to the Virgin Mary (2004), page 48

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A corruption of gallows, used attributively.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gallus (comparative mair gallus, superlative maist gallus)

  1. daring; confident; cheeky.
  2. (obsolete) fit to be hanged; wicked; mischievous
    • 1848, Benjamin A. Baker, A Glance at New York:
      Look, what a gallus walk she's got! I've strong suspicions I'll have to get slung to her one of these days.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      ’Twas murmur we did for a gallus potion would rouse a friar, I’m thinking, and he limp from leching.