confident

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French confident, from Latin confidens (confident, i.e. self-confident, in good or bad sense, bold, daring, audacious, impudent), present participle of confidere (to trust fully, confide). See confide.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

confident (comparative more confident, superlative most confident)

  1. Very sure of something; positive.
    I'm pretty confident that she's not lying, she's acting normally.
    He was confident of success.
  2. Self-assured, self-reliant, sure of oneself.
  3. (obsolete, in negative sense) Forward, impudent.
    • 1775, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The Duenna, I.2:
      I was rated as the most confident ruffian, for daring to approach her room at that hour of night.

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

confident (plural confidents)

  1. Obsolete form of confidant.
    • 1684, John Dryden, The History of the League, translation of Histoire de la Ligue by Louis Maimbourg:
      He managed this consultation with exceeding secrecy, admitting only four or five of his confidents, on whom he most relied
    • 1692–1717, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567:
      a certain Lawyer , a great Confident of the Rebels

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

confident m (plural confidents, feminine confidente)

  1. confidant

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Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

cōnfīdent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of cōnfīdō

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French confident

Noun[edit]

confident m (plural confidenți)

  1. confidant

Declension[edit]