gallu

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See also: gallū

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Akkadian 𒋼𒇲 (gallûm, Gallu).[1]

Noun[edit]

gallu (plural gallus)

  1. Great demons or devils of the ancient Mesopotamian Underworld.
  2. A human adversary, one that is dangerous and implacable.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morris, John (1880) The new nation[1], Original from Oxford University, pages 40& 311 (volume 3 of 5): “Gallu demon.”

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gallus.

Noun[edit]

gallu m (plural gallos)

  1. rooster (male domestic fowl)
    Synonym: pitu

Corsican[edit]

Un gallu.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin gallus. Cognates include Italian gallo and Portuguese galo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡalːu/
  • Hyphenation: gal‧lu

Noun[edit]

gallu m (plural galli)

  1. rooster

References[edit]

Fula[edit]

Noun[edit]

gallu o

  1. (Pulaar) district

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • M. Niang, Pulaar-English English-Pulaar Standard Dictionary, New York: Hippocrene Books, 1997.

Laboya[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gallu

  1. fence
  2. cage
  3. jail

References[edit]

  • Allahverdi Verdizade (2019), “gallu”, in Lamboya word list, Leiden: LexiRumah

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh gallu, from Proto-Celtic *galnati (to be able). Cognate with Irish gal (ardour, valour) and Lithuanian galėti (to be able).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gallu (first-person singular present gallaf)

  1. to be able to, can
  2. to have permission, can
    Synonym: medru
    Antonyms: ffaelu, methu
    • King, Gareth (1993) Modern Welsh: A Comprehensive Grammar (Routledge Grammars), London and New York: Routledge, →ISBN, page 202:
      Galli di fenthyg y llyfr ’ma ar ôl i mi ddefnyddio fe.
      You can borrow the book after I’ve used it.
    Synonym: cael

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the colloquial language, the preterite of this verb is almost never used; the past tense is rendered by means of the periphrastic imperfect, e.g. roedd e’n gallu (he could, he was able to).
  • In the colloquial language, the future tense of this verb has a present-tense meaning as well, so galla i means both ‘I can’ and ‘I will be able to’.

Conjugation[edit]

Alternative verbal adjective forms:

Alternative conditional forms:

Synonyms[edit]

  • (be able to): medru (North Wales)

Antonyms[edit]

  • ffili (fail, be unable, cannot)
  • methu (fail, be unable, cannot)

Noun[edit]

gallu m (plural galluoedd)

  1. ability
  2. might, power, potency

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • anallu (inability; impotence)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gallu allu ngallu unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 100 iii (2)

Yogad[edit]

Noun[edit]

gallú

  1. noise