district

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See also: District

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From French district, from Medieval Latin districtus (a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere (to draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- (apart) +‎ stringere (to draw tight, strain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: dĭs′trĭkt, IPA(key): /ˈdɪstɹɪkt/
  • Hyphenation: dis‧trict
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

district (plural districts)

  1. An administrative division of an area.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘I understand that the district was considered a sort of sanctuary,’ the Chief was saying. ‘An Alsatia like the ancient one behind the Strand, or the Saffron Hill before the First World War. […]’
    the Soho district of London
  2. An area or region marked by some distinguishing feature.
    the Lake District in Cumbria
  3. (Britain) An administrative division of a county without the status of a borough.
    South Oxfordshire District Council

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

district (third-person singular simple present districts, present participle districting, simple past and past participle districted)

  1. (transitive) To divide into administrative or other districts.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

district (comparative more district, superlative most district)

  1. (obsolete) rigorous; stringent; harsh

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch district, from Middle French district, from Medieval Latin districtus (a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringō, distringere (draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- (apart) + stringō, stringere (draw tight, strain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈtrɪkt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dis‧trict
  • Rhymes: -ɪkt

Noun[edit]

district n (plural districten, diminutive districtje n)

  1. district

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: distrik
  • Indonesian: distrik

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

district m (plural districts)

  1. district

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French district, from Medieval Latin districtus (a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringō, distringere (draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- (apart) + stringō, stringere (draw tight, strain).

Noun[edit]

district m (plural districts)

  1. (Jersey) district

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French district

Noun[edit]

district n (plural districte)

  1. district

Declension[edit]