district

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From French district, from Medieval Latin districtus ‎(a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere ‎(to draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- ‎(apart) + stringere ‎(to draw tight, strain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

district ‎(plural districts)

  1. An administrative division of an area.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘I understand that the district was considered a sort of sanctuary,’ the Chief was saying. ‘An Alsatia like the ancient one behind the Strand, or the Saffron Hill before the First World War. […]’
    the Soho district of London
  2. An area or region marked by some distinguishing feature.
    the Lake District in Cumbria
  3. (Britain) An administrative division of a county without the status of a borough.
    South Oxfordshire District Council

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

district ‎(third-person singular simple present districts, present participle districting, simple past and past participle districted)

  1. (transitive) To divide into administrative or other districts.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

district ‎(comparative more district, superlative most district)

  1. (obsolete) rigorous; stringent; harsh
    • Foxe
      punishing with the rod of district severity

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French district, from Medieval Latin districtus ‎(a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringō, distringere ‎(draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- ‎(apart) + stringō, stringere ‎(draw tight, strain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dis‧trict

Noun[edit]

district n ‎(plural districten, diminutive districtje n)

  1. district

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

district m ‎(plural districts)

  1. district

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French district, from Medieval Latin districtus ‎(a district within which the lord may distrain, also jurisdiction), from Latin districtus, past participle of distringō, distringere ‎(draw asunder, compel, distrain), from dis- ‎(apart) + stringō, stringere ‎(draw tight, strain).

Noun[edit]

district m ‎(plural districts)

  1. (Jersey) district