cage

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English[edit]

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A cage

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English cage, from Old French cage, from Latin cavea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cage (plural cages)

  1. an enclosure made of bars, normally to hold animals.
    We keep a bird in a cage.
    The tigers are in a cage to protect the public.
    The most dangerous prisoners are locked away in a cage.
  2. the passenger compartment of a lift
  3. (field hockey or ice hockey, water polo) the goal.
  4. (US derogatory slang) automobile
  5. (figuratively) Something that hinders freedom.
  6. (athletics) The area from which competitors throw a discus or hammer.
  7. (obsolete) A place of confinement for malefactors.
  8. An outer framework of timber, enclosing something within it.
    • 1842, Gwilt, Joseph, “A Glossary of Terms Used by Architects”, in An Encyclopædia of Architecture, Historical, Theoretical, and Practical[1], 2nd edition, London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, published 1851, page 941:
      Cage, in carpentry, is an outer work of timber inclosing another within it. Thus the cage of a stair is the wooden inclosure that encircles it.
  9. (engineering) A skeleton frame to limit the motion of a loose piece, such as a ball valve.
  10. A wirework strainer, used in connection with pumps and pipes.
  11. (mining) The drum on which the rope is wound in a hoisting whim.
  12. (baseball) The catcher's wire mask.
  13. (graph theory) A regular graph that has as few vertices as possible for its girth.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cage (third-person singular simple present cages, present participle caging, simple past and past participle caged)

  1. To put into a cage.
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, “Geothermal Energy”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
  2. To keep in a cage.
  3. To track individual responses to direct mail, either (advertising) to maintain and develop mailing lists or (politics) to identify people who are not eligible to vote because they do not reside at the registered addresses.
  4. (figuratively) To restrict someone's movement or creativity.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cage, from Latin cavea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cage f (plural cages)

  1. cage
  2. (soccer, colloquial) area, penalty area

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cage, from Latin cavea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cage (plural cages)

  1. A cage or pen.
  2. A cell, enclosure or room of diminutive proportions.
  3. A platform or deck.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]