vote

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See also: Vote, voté, !vote, and vot'e

English[edit]

Women casting their votes during the Syrian presidential election, 2014

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vōtum, a form of voveō(I vow) (cognate with Ancient Greek εὔχομαι(eúkhomai, to vow)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁wogʷʰ-. The word is thus a doublet of vow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vote ‎(plural votes)

  1. A formalized choice on matters of administration or other democratic activities.
    The city council decided the matter should go to public vote.
    Parliament will hold a vote of confidence regarding the minister.
  2. An act or instance of participating in such a choice, e.g., by submitting a ballot.
    The Supreme Court upheld the principle of one person, one vote.
    • 1836, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., “Poetry: A Metrical Essay”, republished in The Poems of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Boston, Mass.: Ticknor and Fields, 1862, OCLC 5091562, pages 7–8:
      There breathes no being but has some pretence / To that fine instinct called poetic sense; [] / The freeman, casting with unpurchased hand / The vote that shakes the turrets of the land.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, “chapter I”, in Gossamer (Project Gutenberg; EBook #24394), London: Methuen & Co., published 8 January 2013 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 558189256:
      As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  3. (obsolete) An ardent wish or desire; a vow; a prayer.
    • 1633, Philip Massinger, “The Guardian”, in Three New Playes; viz. The Bashful Lover, The Guardian, The Very Woman. As They have been Often Acted at the Private-House in Black-Friers, by His Late Majesties Servants, with Great Applause, London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his Shop at the Sign of the Prince's Arms in St. Pauls Church-yard, published 1655, OCLC 15553475; republished as “The Guardian. A Comical History. As It hath been Often Acted at the Private-House in Black-Friars, by His Late Majesty's Servants, with Great Applause, 1655.”, in Thomas Coxeter, editor, The Works of Philip Massinger. Volume the Fourth. Containing, The Guardian. A Very Woman. The Old Law. The City Madam. And Poems on Several Occasions, volume IV, London: Printed for T[homas] Davies, in Russel-street, Covent-Garden, 1761, OCLC 6847259, Act V, scene i, page 71:
      Jol[ante]. In you, Sir, / I live; and when, or by the Courſe of Nature, / Or Violence you muſt fall, the End of my / Devotions is, that one and the ſame Hour / May make us fit for Heaven. // Server. I join with you / In my votes that way: []

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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vote ‎(third-person singular simple present votes, present participle voting, simple past and past participle voted)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To cast a vote; to assert a formalized choice in an election.
    The depository may vote shares on behalf of investors who have not submitted instruction to the bank.
    • F. W. Robertson
      To vote on large principles, to vote honestly, requires a great amount of information.

Hyponyms[edit]

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Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

vote

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of votar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of votar

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English vote.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vote m ‎(plural votes)

  1. vote

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

vote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of voter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of voter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of voter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of voter
  5. second-person singular imperative of voter

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Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

vōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of vōtus

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English vote, from Latin vōtum, from voveō, vovēre(vow), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ewegʷʰ-.

Noun[edit]

vote m ‎(plural votes)

  1. (Jersey) vote

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of votar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of votar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of votar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of votar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

vote

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of votar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of votar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of votar.