intellect

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin intellēctus (understanding, intellect), perfect passive participle of Latin intellegō (understand; reason), from inter (between, among) + legō (read), with connotation of bind.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪntəlɛkt/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

intellect (countable and uncountable, plural intellects)

  1. (uncountable) The faculty of thinking, judging, abstract reasoning, and conceptual understanding; the cognitive faculty.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:intelligence
    Intellect is one of man's greatest powers.
  2. (uncountable) The capacity of that faculty (in a particular person).
    They were chosen because of their outstanding intellect.
    • 1983, “Intelligence”, in Shiver, performed by Virna Lindt:
      Arms of stripes and shirts of checks / You had a very nice intellect
  3. A person who has that faculty to a great degree.
    Synonym: intellectual
    Some of the world's leading intellects were meeting there.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin intellēctus (understanding, intellect), perfect passive participle of Latin intellegō (understand; reason).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.tɛ.lɛkt/, /ɛ̃.te.lɛkt/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

intellect m (plural intellects)

  1. (psychology, philosophy) intellect

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]