gard

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See also: Gard, gärd, Gärd, gård, and gárð

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See yard.

Noun[edit]

gard (plural gards)

  1. (obsolete) A garden.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of F. Beaumont to this entry?)
      Trees of the gard.

Etymology 2[edit]

See yard.

Noun[edit]

gard (plural gards)

  1. Obsolete form of guard.

Verb[edit]

gard (third-person singular simple present gards, present participle garding, simple past and past participle garded)

  1. Obsolete form of guard.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for gard in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gard

  1. Romanization of 𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌳

Kashubian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gordъ.

Noun[edit]

gard m

  1. city

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse garðr

Noun[edit]

gard m (definite singular garden, indefinite plural garder, definite plural gardene)

  1. alternative form of gård

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse garðr, from Proto-Germanic *gardaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰórdʰos, from *gʰerdʰ- (to enclose). Akin to English yard.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ɡɑːr/

Noun[edit]

gard m (definite singular garden, indefinite plural gardar, definite plural gardane)

  1. farm
  2. townhouse (often in the compound bygard)
  3. fence (often in the compounds skigard or steingard)
  4. courtyard

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gardaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰórdʰos, from *gʰerdʰ- (to enclose). Cognate with Old Frisian garda, Old English ġeard (English yard), Old Dutch *gart (Dutch gaard), Old High German gart (obsolete German Gart), Old Norse garðr (Icelandic garður, Swedish and Danish gård), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌳𐍃 (gards). The Indo-European root is also the source of Lithuanian gardas, Proto-Slavic *gord (Old Church Slavonic градъ (gradŭ), Russian го́род (górod, town)), Albanian gardh (fence).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gard m

  1. an enclosed place
  2. yard, garden
  3. court
  4. region, land
  5. dwelling

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: gard

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰortós; possibly a substratum word from a Dacian *garda, akin to Albanian gardh (or borrowed from it), or more likely from Proto-Slavic *gordъ, perhaps predating the metathesis occurring in Slavic languages (however this is uncertain as other related terms such as grădină, ogradă, îngrădi have undergone it when borrowed from Slavic). Other suggested possibilities include a link to Proto-Germanic *gardaz. [1] Other Indo-European cognates include English garden, yard, gird, Sanskrit गृह (gṛha, house, home), Old Church Slavonic градъ (gradŭ), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌳𐍃 (gards), German Garten, Danish gård and Norwegian gard, garde, gjerde.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gard n (plural garduri)

  1. fence

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://dexonline.ro/definitie/gard Romanian Explanatory Dictionary

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

gard (plural gards)

  1. guard

Declension[edit]