german

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See also: German and Germán

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French germain, from Latin germānus. See also germane, a formal variant which has survived in specific senses. Not related to the proper noun German.

Adjective[edit]

german (comparative more german, superlative most german)

  1. (obsolete except in set terms) Having the same mother and father; a full (brother or sister).
    brother-german
  2. (obsolete except in set terms) Being born to one’s blood aunt or uncle, a first (cousin).
    cousin-german
    • 1567 Arthur Golding trans., Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book 1, lines 460-2:
      The doubtfull wordes whereof they scan and canvas to an fro.
      Which done, Prometheus sonne began by counsell wise and sage
      His cousin germanes fearfulnesse thus gently to asswage:
  3. (obsolete) Closely related, akin.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xj, in Le Morte Darthur, book II:
      After this Merlyn told vnto kynge Arthur of the prophecye / that there shold be a grete batail besyde Salysbury and Mordred his owne sone sholde be ageynste hym / Also he tolde hym that Basdemegus was his cosyn and germayn vnto kynge Vryence
    • 1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, V.2:
      The phrase would bee more Germaine.
    • c. 1605-1608, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens
    Wert thou a leopard, thou wert german to the lion.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

german (plural germans)

  1. (obsolete) A near relative.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.viii:
      Which when his german saw, the stony feare / Ran to his hart, and all his sence dismayd []
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German (of Germany).

Noun[edit]

german (plural germans)

  1. An elaborate round dance, often with a waltz movement.
    • 1985, Betty Casey, Dance Across Texas (page 49)
      Through the years, though, the german was replaced by new and more popular dances, but in many instances the name stayed on.
  2. A social party at which the german is danced.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

german n (genitive singular germans, no plural)

  1. germanium (chemical element)

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɛr.man/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Chemical element
Ge
Previous: gal (Ga)
Next: arsen (As)

german m inan

  1. germanium, a chemical element

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Germānus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

german m or n (feminine singular germană, masculine plural germani, feminine and neuter plural germane)

  1. German

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

german m (plural germani, feminine equivalent germană)

  1. a German person

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]