moor

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mor, from Old English mōr, from Proto-Germanic *mōraz, from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Cognates include Welsh môr, Old Irish muir (from Proto-Celtic *mori); Scots muir, Dutch moer, Old Saxon mōr, Old Saxon mūr, German Moor and perhaps also Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹 (marei). See mere.

Noun[edit]

moor (plural moors)

  1. An extensive waste covered with patches of heath, and having a poor, light soil, but sometimes marshy, and abounding in peat; a heath
    A cold, biting wind blew across the moor, and the travellers hastened their step.
    In her girlish age she kept sheep on the moor.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall:
      the ruins yet resting in the wild moors
  2. A game preserve consisting of moorland.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English moren, from unattested Old English *mārian, from Proto-West Germanic *mairōn (to moor, fasten to), related to *maida- (post), from Proto-Indo-European *mēyt-, *meyt-, from *mēy-, *mey- (stake, pole). Cognate with Dutch meren (to moor), marren (to bind).

Some boats moored off Chicago

Verb[edit]

moor (third-person singular simple present moors, present participle mooring, simple past and past participle moored)

  1. (intransitive, nautical) To cast anchor or become fastened.
  2. (transitive, nautical) To fix or secure (e.g. a vessel) in a particular place by casting anchor, or by fastening with ropes, cables or chains or the like.
    the vessel was moored in the stream
    they moored the boat to the wharf.
  3. (transitive) To secure or fix firmly.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading[edit]

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013), “mairja-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch moorden, from Middle Dutch morden.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

moor (present moor, present participle moordende, past participle gemoor)

  1. (intransitive) to murder

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Moor (“member of a North African people”, became synonymous with “Saracen”).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moor m (plural moren, diminutive moortje n)

  1. Something black, notably a black horse
  2. A whistling kettle, used to boil water in, as for tea or coffee

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Negerhollands: Moor

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moor (genitive moori, partitive moori)

  1. (pejorative) an elderly woman; a crone

Declension[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian māra, from Proto-West Germanic *maiʀō. Cognates include West Frisian mear and German mehr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

moor

  1. comparative degree of fúul; more

Pronoun[edit]

moor

  1. comparative degree of fúul; more

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “moor”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN