moer

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: möer and mör

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch moer.

Noun[edit]

moer (plural moere)

  1. nut: female screw, which fits on a bolt
    Ek draai die moer vas
  2. seed tuber

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch moer.

Noun[edit]

moer (uncountable)

  1. dregs, lees, sediment (of liquid)

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

moer (present moer, present participle moerende, past participle gemoer)

  1. to hit someone very hard
    Ek gaan jou hard moer.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mur/, [muːr]
  • Hyphenation: moer
  • Rhymes: -uːr

Etymology 1[edit]

Contraction of moeder (mother) by syncope of medial /d/.

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. (rare, archaic) mother
  2. a queen bee
  3. a female hare
  4. a female rabbit
  5. a female ferret
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A shortening of moerschroef, from moer (mother) +‎ schroef (bolt).

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. a type of fastener with a threaded hole; a nut
  2. (informal) something small and insignificant (in the phrase geen moer)
    Het kan me geen moer schelen.
    I do not care at all.

Etymology 3[edit]

Contraction of moeder, a dialectal variant of modder (mud).

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. sediment formed in various alcoholic drinks and vinegar; compare French: mère de vinaigre

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle Dutch moer (morass), from Old Dutch [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *mōraz. Related to meer (lake). Cognate with English moor, Old English mōr (moor, marsh).

Noun[edit]

moer n (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. morass, marsh, peat
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

moer ?

  1. Alternative form of muur chickweed

References[edit]

  • Dr. P.A.F. van Veen e.a., Etymologisch Woordenboek. De herkomst van onze woorden., Van Dale Lexicografie, 1989 [Dutch etymological dictionary, in Dutch]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Moendo millo ("milling corn") in a traditional watermill

Etymology[edit]

13th century. From Latin molere (to mill), from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, crush).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

moer (first-person singular present moio, first-person singular preterite moín, past participle moído)

  1. (transitive) to mill
  2. (transitive) to grind, to crush

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • amoado (liquid dough; mixture)
  • moa (molar; millstone)
  • moenda (action of milling)
  • muíña (chaff)
  • muíño (mill)
  • muiñeira (Galician traditional dance and bagpipe music)

References[edit]

  • moer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • moer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • moer” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • moer” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German magar, from Proto-Germanic *magraz. Cognate with German mager, Dutch mager, Icelandic magur; also related to English meagre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moer (masculine moeren or moren, neuter moert, comparative méi moer, superlative am moersten)

  1. lean
  2. skinny, meagre

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese moer, from Latin molere, present active infinitive of molō (I grind, I mill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

moer (first-person singular present indicative moo, past participle moído)

  1. (transitive) to mill
  2. (transitive) to grind, crush
  3. (figuratively, colloquial, takes a reflexive pronoun, intransitive) to tire; exhaust

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]