moer

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See also: möer and mör

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch moer

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

moer (plural moere)

  1. nut: female screw, which fits on a bolt
    Ek draai die moer vas
  2. seed tuber

moer (uncountable)

  1. dregs, lees, sediment (of liquid)

Verb[edit]

moer (present moer, present participle moerende, past participle gemoer)

  1. to hit someone very hard
    Ek gaan jou hard moer.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contraction of moeder (mother) by syncope of medial /d/.

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. (rare, archaic) mother
  2. a queen bee
  3. a female hare
  4. a female rabbit
  5. a female ferret
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A shortening of moerschroef, from moer (mother) +‎ schroef (bolt).

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. a type of fastener with a threaded hole; a nut
  2. (informal) something small and insignificant (in the phrase geen moer)
    Het kan me geen moer schelen.
    I do not care at all.

Etymology 3[edit]

Contraction of moeder, a dialectal variant of modder (mud).

Noun[edit]

moer f (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. sediment formed in various alcholic drinks and vinegar; compare French: mère de vinaigre

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle Dutch moer (morass), from Old Dutch [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *mōraz. Related to meer (lake). Cognate with English moor, Old English mōr (moor, marsh).

Noun[edit]

moer n (plural moeren, diminutive moertje n)

  1. morass, marsh, peat

Etymology 5[edit]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

moer ?

  1. Alternative form of muur chickweed

References[edit]

  • Dr. P.A.F. van Veen e.a., Etymologisch Woordenboek. De herkomst van onze woorden., Van Dale Lexicografie, 1989 [Dutch etymological dictionary, in Dutch]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin molere (to mill), from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, crush).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

moer (first-person singular present moio, first-person singular preterite moín, past participle moído)

  1. (transitive) to mill
  2. (transitive) to grind, to crush

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • amoado (liquid dough; mixture)
  • moa (molar; millstone)
  • moenda (action of milling)
  • muíña (chaff)
  • muíño (mill)
  • muiñeira (Galician traditional dance and bagpipe music)

References[edit]

  • moer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • moer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • moer” in Santamarina, Antón (coord.): Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/TILG/>
  • moer” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/Tesouro>



Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moer (masculine moeren or moren, neuter moert, comparative méi moer, superlative am moersten)

  1. lean
  2. skinny, meagre

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese moer, from Latin molere, present active infinitive of molō (I grind, I mill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

moer

  1. (transitive) to mill
  2. (transitive) to grind, crush
  3. (figuratively, colloquial, takes a reflexive pronoun, intransitive) to tire; exhaust

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]