weald

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See also: Weald

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English weald, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz. Compare German Wald, Dutch woud. See also wold, ultimately of the same origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

weald (plural wealds)

  1. A wood or forest; a wooded land or region; also, an open country; often used in place names.
    • Tennyson
      Fled all night long by glimmering waste and weald, / And heard the spirits of the waste and weald / Moan as she fled.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur). See also the related Anglian-derived term wald.

Noun[edit]

weald m

  1. forest
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *waldą, whence also Old High German walt, Old Norse vald (Danish vold).

Noun[edit]

weald n

  1. power
  2. authority
Usage notes[edit]

Also used in the form ġeweald.