wald

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See also: Wald

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /wɔːld/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔːld

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English walden, from Old English wealdan (to rule, control, determine, direct, command, govern, possess, wield, exercise, cause, bring about), from Proto-West Germanic *waldan, from Proto-Germanic *waldaną (to reign), from Proto-Indo-European *waldʰ- (to be strong, be powerful, prevail, possess).

Verb[edit]

wald (third-person singular simple present walds, present participle walding, simple past and past participle walded)

  1. (UK dialectal, transitive, intransitive) To govern; inherit.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wald, iwald, from Old English weald (power, authority), from Proto-Germanic *waldą (power), from Proto-Indo-European *waldʰ- (to be strong, be powerful, prevail, possess). Cognate with German Gewalt (force, power, control, violence), Swedish våld (force, violence).

Noun[edit]

wald (plural walds)

  1. (UK dialectal) Power; strength.
  2. (UK dialectal) Command; control; possession.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English wald, from Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-West Germanic *walþu, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur).

Noun[edit]

wald (plural walds)

  1. Forest; woods.
    • 1812, Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Digitized edition, page 124:
      … we still recognize the ancient traditions of the Goths, concerning the wald-elven,…
    • 1853, Robert Simpson, History of Sanquhar[1], page 16:
      the romantic pass of the "wald path," along which runs a spur of an old Roman road
    • 1857, George Bradshaw, Bradshaw's illustrated hand-book to Switzerland and the Tyrol[2], Digitized edition, published 2006, page 1:
      MARDEN and STAPLEHURST—All this part of the line, through the Weald of Kent, i.e., the wald or forest, which still prevails here.
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-West Germanic *walþu, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz.

Noun[edit]

wald (plural walds or walden)

  1. wood (wooded area), forest
    • c. 1225, St. Margaret of Antioch:
      Þe wurmes & te wilde deor ... o þis wald wunieð.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • c. 1275, Layamon, Brut:
      Ȝif æi mon hine mihte ifinden uppe þissere wælden, ...
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • c. 1330, Sir Tristrem:
      Beliagog in þat nede Fond him riche wald To fine.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1450, Wars of Alexander:
      Was nouthire waldis in þar walke ne watir to fynde.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: wold, weald, wald
  • Scots: wald

References[edit]


Old Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vald, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz.

Noun[edit]

wald

  1. force, violence

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *walþu, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wald m

  1. forest

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *walþu, from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr.

Noun[edit]

wald m

  1. forest

Descendants[edit]