wield

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wēlden, which combines forms from two closely related verbs: Old English wealdan (to control, rule) (strong class 7) and Old English wieldan (to control, subdue) (weak). The reason for the merger was that in Middle English the -d in the stem made it hard to distinguish between strong and weak forms in the past tense. Both verbs ultimately derive from Proto-Germanic *waldaną (to rule).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wield (third-person singular simple present wields, present participle wielding, simple past and past participle wielded)

  1. (obsolete) To command, rule over; to possess or own.
    • 1470–1485 (date produced), Thomas Malory, “Capitulum 7”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book V, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      There was never kyng sauff myselff that welded evir such knyghtes.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (obsolete) To control, to guide or manage.
  3. (obsolete) To carry out, to bring about.
  4. To handle with skill and ease, especially a weapon or tool.
  5. To exercise (authority or influence) effectively.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ wield, verb.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2021.

Anagrams[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wield (inflected wielde)

  1. Alternative spelling of wíeld

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English wieldan (to control), a derivative of wealdan (to govern), from Proto-Germanic *waldaną. Cognate with German walten, Swedish vålla.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wield

  1. To control, to guide or manage.