dwale

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dwale (stupor; deception; delusion, evil), from Old English dwala, dwola (error, heresy; doubt; madman, deceiver, heretic) and Old Norse dvala (sleep, stupor).

Noun[edit]

dwale (countable and uncountable, plural dwales)

  1. Belladonna or a similar soporific plant.
    • 1842, J. van Voorst, The Phytologist, p. 595.
      Beneath and around the clumps of ragged moss-grown elder and hoary stunted whitethorn (...) rise thickets of tall nettles and rank hemlock, concealing the deadly but alluring dwale
    • 1934, Chambers's Journal, page 198:
      All parts of the dwale are poisonous, said to resemble snake bite, but the roots are said to be four or five times as virulent as the rest of the plant.
    • 2014, Jenny Harper, Face the Wind and Fly:
      It was not bog myrtle at all, it was dwale.
    • 2014, Karen Maitland, The Vanishing Witch:
      Monkshood and dwale belong to Hecate, the moon goddess of the witches, and by their use are witches able to fly.
  2. (archaic) a sleeping-potion, especially one made from belladonna
    • 2007, Barbara S. Bowers, The Medieval Hospital and Medical Practice, page 197:
      The authors studied the ingredients and method of administration to try to ascertain whether dwale was effective, and they found it certainly could have worked.
    • 2016, Toby Clements, Broken Faith, page 258:
      'That is all?' Payne askes. 'You need no salve? No dwale?'
    • 2018, The World of Lore, Volume 3, The World of Lore, Volume 3:
      Dwale was a solution of wine mixed with a number of other ingredients, Some were pretty mile, like lettuce and boar bile. But the recipe also called for hemlock and belladonna, both known to be highly poisonous.
    • 2020, Sarah Woodbury, Chevalier:
      Cadell agrees the vial contains arsenic, not willow bark, and it is no wonder Rollo found relief from what was in the flask since it isn't wine but dwale.
  3. (dialect) A torpor.
    • 1874, Charles Mackay, The Lost Beauties of the English Language, page 54:
      He's in a dwale, a dead sleep; a common expression in the North of England.
    • 2008, Mary Leared, A Horseshoe Clown, page 44:
      I stayed up there in a dwale – not seeing, not even thinking – until suddenly the wind got up and its chill woke me.
  4. A bugbear.
    • 1856, Sydney Dobell, England in Time of War - Issue 34, page 72:
      Consume us; shake the darkness like a tree, And fill the night with mischiefs, — blights and dwales, Weevils, and rots, and cankers!
    • 1981, Alexander Theroux, Darconville's Cat, page 384:
      Tickle under their chins microscopical djinns or tease geloscopical dwales who live in The Tree That Can Never Be and fish for chocolate whales?
  5. (heraldry) a sable or black color.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English dwalen, from Old English dwalian, from Proto-Germanic *dwalōną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwelH- (to make turbid).

Verb[edit]

dwale (third-person singular simple present dwales, present participle dwaling, simple past and past participle dwaled)

  1. (dialectal) To mutter deliriously
Related terms[edit]
  • dwaal — a dreamy, dazed, or absent-minded state

References[edit]

  • dwale in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dwale in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

dwale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of dwalen

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *thwāla, *twēla, *thweila, from Proto-West Germanic *þwahilu.

Noun[edit]

dwâle f or m

  1. cloth
  2. towel

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: dwaal, dweil
  • Limburgish: dweiel

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English dwala, dwola; reinforced and semantically influenced by Old Norse dvala.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dwale (plural dwales)

  1. A stupor or trance; torpor.
  2. Belladonna or a similar soporific plant.
  3. A sleeping draught, especially if made from belladonna.
  4. An evil individual; a wrongdoer.
  5. (rare) Evil; wrongdoing.
  6. (rare) A delusion or deception.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]