stupor

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Middle English, borrowed from Latin stupor (insensibility, numbness, dullness). Distantly related (from Proto-Indo-European, via Proto-Germanic) to stint, stub, and steep.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stupor (countable and uncountable, plural stupors)

  1. A state of greatly dulled or completely suspended consciousness or sensibility; (particularly medicine) a chiefly mental condition marked by absence of spontaneous movement, greatly diminished responsiveness to stimulation, and usually impaired consciousness.
  2. A state of extreme apathy or torpor resulting often from stress or shock.
    Synonym: daze

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

stupor (third-person singular simple present stupors, present participle stuporing, simple past and past participle stupored) (transitive)

  1. To place into a stupor; to stupefy.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From stupeō (to be struck senseless, be stunned, be astonished) +‎ -or (nominal suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stupor m (genitive stupōris); third declension

  1. Numbness; dullness, insensibility, stupidity, stupefaction; astonishment, wonder, amazement.
    Synonym: torpor
  2. (especially) Dullness, stupidity, stolidity.
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Inflection[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative stupor stupōrēs
Genitive stupōris stupōrum
Dative stupōrī stupōribus
Accusative stupōrem stupōrēs
Ablative stupōre stupōribus
Vocative stupor stupōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • stupor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stupor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stupor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • stupor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

stupor

  1. indefinite plural of stupa

Anagrams[edit]