torpor

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin torpor (numbness), from torpeō (I am numb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

torpor (countable and uncountable, plural torpors)

  1. A state of being inactive or stuporous.
  2. A state of apathy or lethargy.
    Synonyms: lethargy, sluggishness, languor, torpidity
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, chapter 7, in The Last Man:
      She knew that she was the cause of her husband's utter ruin; and she strung herself to bear the consequences. The reproaches which agony extorted; or worse, cureless, uncomplaining depression, when his mind was sunk in a torpor, not the less painful because it was silent and moveless.
  3. (biology) A state similar to hibernation characterised by energy-conserving, very deep sleep.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From torpeō +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

torpor m (genitive torpōris); third declension

  1. numbness, stupefaction
  2. sluggishness, listlessness, inactivity

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative torpor torpōrēs
Genitive torpōris torpōrum
Dative torpōrī torpōribus
Accusative torpōrem torpōrēs
Ablative torpōre torpōribus
Vocative torpor torpōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

torpor m (plural torpores)

  1. torpor (state of being inactive or stuporous)